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HR strategic competencies:

Case study 1:

You are required to answer Only Two Case-based Questions, Should you elect to answer all cases,  you will receive the higher marks achieved across all.  (i.e. your mark for Case A is 10, Case B is 9, and Case C is 8, you will be awarded the marks for the highest two case questions 10 and 9) 

Case-based question worth 10 marks

The Case against Boing

On October 29, 2018, Indonesian Lion Air Flight 610 crashed seemingly without reason. On March 10, 2019, Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crashed six minutes after takeoff. Both flights were Boeing 737 MAX aircrafts, both crashes killed everyone onboard and in both cases, Boeing blamed the dead pilots in blatantly xenophobic attacks instead of claiming any responsibility. It was later discovered that Boeing’s financial corner-cutting caused the planes to fall out of the sky: In order to compete with European aerospace company Airbus, Boeing insisted to FAA regulators that the 737 MAX would not require additional pilot training, because pilot training costs money. Therefore, Boeing allowed pilots to fly planes equipped with a brand new system called MCAS with zero training on how to use the system, and hundreds of people from all over the world paid the price with their lives.

Background 

Boeing originally launched the 737 back in 1967 and had twice rolled out updates for the platform. They were updates that wouldn’t require retraining for the pilots – a key cost for airlines introducing new model aircraft.

To squeeze just one more model out of the old 737 design, without developing a new clean-sheet single-aisle jet, Boeing rushed into a series of mis-steps which eventually led to the deaths of 346 people.

The newer, larger, turbo fan jet technology would offer a 10-15% reduction in fuel burn… that was very attractive to new customers after Airbus had offered a similar upgrade of the newer generation jet engines on their A320 platform… that aircraft would be called the A320 NEO (new engine options) and forced Boeing’s hand to come up with a competitive solution, quickly.

The main difference was the original Airbus A320 design had a lot more ground clearance, allowing a larger engine to fit under the wing without changing the centre of gravity or centre of thrust. For the ageing Boeing 737, closer to the ground, the larger engines were simply unable to fit under the wing so needed to be located both further forward, and mounted higher up on the wing. Looking from the front of the plane it is clear that the top of the engine cowling is now above the wing, before it was below.

The Root cause of the mechanical Problem 

This new engine would alter the critical flight balance of the plane. No problem… come up with a software solution to re-trim the plane’s balance whilst it was flying. That software would be called MCAS, the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System.

The Boeing software engineers knew about it, but the pilots of the new 737 MAX didn’t. And when the system went rogue, the pilots were unaware of how to disable the system that pushed the nose of the plane down when fed faulty information from the Angle of Attack sensor.

In both crash cases, the flight crews battled for a number of minutes with the rogue software, unable to counteract the terrifying pitching of the nose downward.

The Long Version (42 minutes) 

YouTube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdYcJldzOdw

Youtube link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2tuKiiznsY

After you read the above news, and watch the video segment above, there is a lot to learn from this case, The questions will focus on the corporate side of things. 

1- Question overview: Compare Boing’s vision, mission, and culture against the discussed case, highlighting the areas of opportunities, Worth 10 Marks 

1.1. What is Boing Vision, mission, company culture and how did it lead to the Max8 disaster. Worth 5 Marks 

(Hints: Organize your answer into two clearly marked sections:  Boing’s vision, mission, and culture discussing changes that may have lead to the Max8 disasters, do not exceed three paragraphs) 

1.2. Discuss at least two opportunities you would focus on as the HR Professional in Boing. explaining – in no more than four paragraphs – what would you do to ensure this situation will not happen again. Worth 5 Marks 

(Hints: Organize your answer into clearly marked headings sections, in your answer focus on prioritizing areas within HRM responsibility that would solve the majority of the opportunities on hand,  Do not use Essay formats, Be Specific with your answers, and use complete sentences | If you would like to expand on ideas, concepts, and theories that are not yours, you MUST cite, Citations should be done Intext using APA format. Cited content should not be more than 15% of y our answer, do not exceed four paragraphs)

Case study 2:

You are required to answer Only Two Case-based Questions, Should you elect to answer all cases,  you will receive the higher marks achieved across all.  (i.e. your mark for Case A is 10, Case B is 9, and Case C is 8, you will be awarded the marks for the highest two case questions 10 and 9) 

Case-based question worth 10 marks

Transforming health care with AI: Tons of potential, but not without pitfalls

‘Caring still matters. Much of this will involve high touch, as well as high tech’: Doctor

By Sheryl Ubelacker 04/08/2019

Some worry that AI will erode the role of physicians, nurses and other providers, potentially at a cost to patient care. REUTERS/Regis Duvignau

 

TORONTO (AI) — It’s already crept into so many aspects of everyday life, from powering digital assistants like Siri and Alexa to personalizing entertainment choices on streaming services like Netflix to driving the development of autonomous vehicles.

Now artificial intelligence (AI) is poised to revolutionize key aspects of how doctors practice medicine and the ways in which patients are diagnosed and treated.

AI systems, specifically machine learning, have the ability to analyze massive sets of anonymized patient data and look for patterns in a way that the human brain, as elegant and complex as that organ may be, cannot begin to approach.

Take, for instance, the myriad forms of medical imaging that need to be scrutinized by radiologists, pathologists and other specialists to look for anomalies that might indicate disease — from cardiology and cancer to fractures and neurological conditions.

An example is using an AI system to assess photos of skin lesions to determine if they’re cancerous. And if so, what kind of cancer?

If you train (the systems) on 100,000 examples, then you’re about as good as a dermatologist at that, maybe slightly better,” says Geoffrey Hinton, chief scientific adviser at the Vector Institute for Artificial Intelligence and head of Google’s Brain Team Toronto.

We know that if you were to train on 10 million examples, you’d be much better than the best dermatologist.”

You may access the original article here:

https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/transforming-health-care-with-ai-tons-of-potential-but-not-without-pitfalls-1.4370124

OR here

https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/transforming-health-care-with-ai-tons-of-potential-but-not-without-pitfalls

Q1- What are the different Strategic HR Competencies that you can relate the above article to? Why? (Worth 10 marks)

Q1 Hints: Review the studied Ulrich, and HRPA Models. If you are to bring such program into your organization-what competencies would you be applying/practicing then, Reflect on the link with at least TWO of the competencies, Do Not Exceed three paragraphs each. | Be Specific with your answers, and use complete sentences | If you would like to expand on ideas, concepts, and theories that are not yours You MUST cite, Citations should be done Intext using APA format. Cited content should not be more than 15% of your answer)

Case study 3:

Discover Ability is a free online portal and resource that connects Ontario businesses directly to people with disabilities. The online portal connects employers directly with persons with disabilities seeking employment, includes a 6-step guide acts as a great resource for employers, and provides answers to any questions employers may have when hiring—and retaining—employees with disabilities.



 

Funded by the Government of Ontario and powered by Magnet, a data-rich, job-matching technology platform. Discover Ability is a free online portal and resource that connects Ontario businesses directly to people with disabilities.

The Discover Ability Network includes a variety of associations, community and government partners:

· Business Council of Canada

· BioTalent Canada

· Canadian Manufacturers and Exports

· Excellence in Manufacturing Consortium

· Human Resources Professionals Association

· Information and Communications Technology Council

· Information Technology Association of Canada

· Magnet

· Ontario Chamber of Commerce

· OTEC

· Canadian Business SenseAbility

· Toronto Financial Services Alliance

· Government of Ontario

The online portal connects employers directly with persons with disabilities seeking employment, includes a 6-step guide acts as a great resource for employers, and provides answers to any questions employers may have when hiring—and retaining—employees with disabilities.


Discoverability Read more!

Video Segments – White Papers:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6OPxApjbAQ

Plan Canada International and Little Ray’s Zoo share their solid experience with hiring amazing employees who take pride in their skills and the value they add to the workplace regardless the disability they identify with. Employers are encouraged to allow the process to fit to the individual’s talent. Building up for a more inclusive future starts now!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_mercy1Jgo

Abilities Centre (Whitby, ON) shares three solid milestones on how inclusion does empower the socio-economic structure of businesses and communities, equally.

Did you hear the Gentleman saying Return on Inclusion?

After you read the above, watch the  short video segments above and visit the website https://discoverability.network/ Answer the following Questions:

 

1- Did you have any prior knowledge of Discoverability network or any similar initiatives? what are the names of those other initiatives if you knew any? this is a non-marked question.

2- Speak to the social AND economical return on Investment to such a network (Discoverability), AND how might such initiatives impact your work as an HRM Professional. 10 marks

(Hints: Organize your answer into two clearly marked sections:1- Discuss the impacts on the society, the economy, the community, and the business  2- Explain at least one  impact on your work as an HRM professional. – in no more twenty lines – | Be Specific with your answers, and use complete sentences | If you would like to expand on ideas, concepts, and theories that are not yours You MUST cite, Citation should be done Intext using APA format. Cited content should not be more than 15% of your answer)

Case study 4:

With NY PopsUp, Jon Batiste strikes up a band to restart the arts on New York’s streets

 

CBS “Late Show” bandleader Jon Batiste, center, kicks off the first of 100 days of NY PopsUp concerts Saturday at New York’s Javits Center. Performing with him are Ayodele Casel, left, and Anthony Roth Costanzo, far right. (Toby Tenenbaum)

Peter Marks Feb. 21, 2021 at 1:47 p.m. EST

NEW YORK — Riding the artists’ bus from Manhattan to Brooklyn — the second stop of the launch Saturday of NY PopsUp — Jon Batiste explained his enthusiasm for a project reviving live entertainment on the streets of the state during the pandemic.

“This is what I like to call ‘social music,’ ” said “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert’s” songwriter and bandleader. “You can use music to minister to so many sectors of society.”

It was a ministry of sound and rhythm that Batiste and a cadre of singers, dancers and instrumentalists brought indoors to the Javits Center, a sprawling site these days of coronavirus vaccinations, and then outdoors to Brooklyn parks, chichi shopping districts and housing projects. They were helping to kick off a public-private collaboration that on 100 scattered days between now and Labor Day will sponsor performers in concerts across the state — many unannounced.

Along with Batiste, some major talent will be participating: the likes of Chris Rock, Amy Schumer, Idina Menzel, Hugh Jackman, Kenan Thompson and Billy Porter have signed on for upcoming free performances. But as Saturday’s events demonstrated, NY PopsUp shows will also provide employment for performers who are not household names. Among those who danced and sang with Batiste were tap dancer Ayodele Casel; countertenor Anthony Roth Costanzo; and a band that included Endea Owens on bass, Bria Skonberg on trumpet, Joe Saylor and Nêgah Santos on percussion, John Altieri on sousaphone, and Tivon Pennicott on sax.

“All artists are itching to get back,” the Bronx-born Casel said, sitting in the Javits Center green room after the first show. “I feel energized and moved. It’s so humbling to see people who want to be communicating with us.”

Organized by film and Broadway producer Scott Rudin and Tribeca Film Festival co-founder Jane Rosenthal — and supported by a $5 million state grant — NY PopsUp is the nation’s most ambitious performing-arts restart campaign. “It’s a plan to get New York up and running again,” said New York State Health Commissioner Howard Zucker, who attended the Javits Center launch. He added that the enthusiasm sparked by the entertainers reflected “the spirit of everyone in New York City coming out.”

 

Jon Batiste plays his melodica at the first NY PopsUp performance Saturday at New York’s Javits Center, which is doubling these days as a coronavirus vaccination site. (Toby Tenenbaum)

Because the coronavirus imposes severe restrictions on public gatherings, the size of the NY PopsUp shows has to be strictly controlled. The inaugural event at Javits played to a socially distanced and masked audience of about 60 medical workers and members of the New York Army National Guard, who gathered in a room a level below the vast vaccination floor.

“Thank you so much for putting your life on the line,” Batiste, wearing sneakers and a white T-shirt, declared from the stage, after a rendition at the piano of his own “Don’t Stop.” The eclectic 40-minute performance — also streamed on Instagram Live — included a tap solo with recorded narration by the silver-shoed Casel, titled “While I Have the Floor,” and Costanzo singing “Ave Maria.” The vibrant mash-up that followed, with Casel, Costanzo, Batiste and the band performing George and Ira Gershwin’s “Slap That Bass” and “I Got Rhythm,” conveyed a unifying sense of where American eras and cultures converge.

 


NY PopsUp Read more!

Watch Jon Batiste below (1:22 Minutes) Historical footage from 2015 to give you an idea

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcGRNtBRbw0

After you read the above news, and watch the “Love Riot” short video segment above: 

1- Compare Jon Batiste’s behavior to the studied Competencies in both frameworks (RBL/HRPA), Identify/name two competencies that you can see Jon Batiste practicing according to the above news, defend your answer, why did you choose those two competencies? Worth 5 Marks 

(Hints: Organize your answer into two clearly marked sections:1- Names of the Competencies and model 2- Give at least one reason/competency. explaining – in no more than five lines – why did you choose the competencies you choose.| Do not use Essay formats, Be Specific with your answers, and use complete sentences | If you would like to expand on ideas, concepts, and theories that are not yours You MUST cite, Citations should be done Intext using APA format. Cited content should not be more than 15% of your answer)

2- If Jon Batiste is the Brand/Organization you are working for, as the HRM Professional in Jon Batiste’s Band :

2.1 Would you recommend those PopsUp activities to continue? Why? Worth 2.5 Marks 

2.2 Since you know all about ROI, and that everything we do is for a reason, and usually there is a sort of return on our investments (time, money, effort,..) what might be the motive for Jon Batiste to perform in those PopsUp shows? Worth 2.5 Marks 

(Hints: Organize your answer into two clearly marked sections:1- Answering the first question with a clear yes, or No, then discussing your reasons. 2- Give at least two reasons why would you accept or reject those shows to continue. 2- Don’t be tricked by the word ROI, there are no calculations attached. Explain – in no more than five lines -What might be the intrinsic motives that would create the (WFIM) for Jon to take on those shows.| Do not use Essay formats, Be Specific with your answers, and use complete sentences | If you would like to expand on ideas, concepts, and theories that are not yours, you MUST cite, Citations should be done Intext using APA format. Cited content should not be more than 15% of your answer)

Students learn to deliver their expertise in various human resource disciplines in ways that directly support the business goals of organizations analyzing

business needs, developing metrics to support recommendations and evaluate programs. They use specific human resource competencies to add value to

organizations through human resource initiatives. Students develop the skills of a business partner whose expertise is welcomed and rewarded by organizations

for whom they work. These skills have been identified through comprehensive research as those that distinguish successful human resource professionals; this

entails the use of technical expertise in the traditional human resource disciplines, as well as, mastery of an additional group of human resource competencies

that enable them to support and be seen to support the strategic imperatives of their organization. Learning experiences will include case analyses, field

research, lecture, role play, group work and presentations. The course will begin by analyzing broader business cases rather than human resource issues;

learners identify ways their expertise can contribute to meeting business needs. Learners will also explore and practice the domains in the delivery of human

resources expertise to organizations. A capstone group presentation is made recommending a human resources initiative in a business setting.

Strategic HRM Competencies

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on third-party commercial websites.

By clicking to go to the next slide you are acknowledging reading, understanding and approving to the
above!

This Course is not for everyone. It is not HRM for

Dummies . It is not for those who are afraid of lots

of data, Numbers, and Metrics It is not for those

who want a quick dip in the fountain of HRMM

knowledge so they can catch the next wave.

CAUTION!

Module 1

The Journey of Human Resources
Management

This journey has more of a direction than a destination. HRMM wants

to add value, to contribute in meaningful ways to employees and line

managers inside the company and to customers, communities,

partners, and investors outside the company. A

Interpersonal Skills – Show respect for the diverse
opinions, values, belief systems, and contributions of
others.

Interpersonal Skills – Interact with others in groups
or teams in ways that contribute to effective working
relationships and the achievement of goals.

Develop and present an human resource project

and project plan to address a business issue

Analyze strategic business issues to identify
human resource opportunities for supporting
corporate objectives

04

03

02

01

Module Learning Objectives

The Journey of Human Resources Management

3. Why are we Studying the Business in an HRM Course?

2. Changing Business Context

1. What Is Human Resources Management?

Agenda

The term “human resources” may refer

to five different subjects.

While Studying this course let’s

introduce you to what is meant with

HRM

What is HRM?
HRM Profession

HRM Department

HRM Practices

HRM Professionals

HRM Issues

The HRM profession is growing dramatically in numbers,

global reach and scientific sophistication. Consider the record

membership in many HRM-oriented professional associations

around the world:

• Chartered Institute for Personnel Development (England and

Europe): 127,000 members.

• Canada Council of Human resources: 24,000 members.

• Australian Human resource Institute: 15,000 members.

• National Institute of Personnel Management, India: 11,000

members.

• Association of Brazil for Human resources: 8,000 members.

• Institute of People Management, South Africa: 8,000

members.

HRM Profession

✓ The Human Resources Professionals Association

(HRMPA)

✓ The Institute for Performance and Learning

(I4PL)

✓ Alternate Dispute Resolution Institute of Ontario

(ADRIO)

✓ Board of Canadian Certified Safety Professionals

(BCCSP)

✓ National Institute for Disability Management and

Return to Work (NIDMAR)

✓ Canadian Payroll Association (CPA)

✓ And more

HRM Profession, Canadian
HRM Professional Associations

HRM often refers to the department or function. As start-up

organizations grow, business leaders realize that they need

functional expertise to meet changing business needs.

Finance, IT, marketing, and HRM -functional areas become

separate departments or functions that bring their expertise

and knowledge to solve business problems. In larger

organizations,

HRM departments may be very complex, with HRM

professionals working in embedded organization units

(business, functional, or geography units), in centers of

expertise where they offer specific technical advice, or in

corporations where they oversee all HRM work within a

company. The HRM department may be thought of as a

“business within a business,”

The HRM Department

HRM is the label we put on a specific set of practices, policies,

procedures, and programs that manage people and

organizations. There are dozens of HRM practices that may be

created. 2 We have clustered this array into four categories:

1- People

2- Performance

3- Information

4- Work

HRM Practices

For many people, HRM refers to the group of people who

make up the profession, who work in HRM departments, and

who design and deliver the HRM practices. As suggested in

the introduction, demands on HRM continue to increase, and

the expectations on HRM professionals have changed

dramatically over the 100 years since the National Cash

Register Company established the first personnel department

after a particularly rancorous strike in 1901.

HRM Professionals

Finally, HRM is often used as the label for a broad category of

issues related to people management (talent, human capital,

workforce) and organizations (teams, organization capability,

culture), not just those issues within the HRM department.

HRM Issues

66% of the people
who answered the RBL

Group survey said that their

vice president of HRM

reported directly to the

CEO.

Did you know?

Business Context

Globalization

Technology

Employees inside

Customers and consumers outside

Investors

Competitors

Globalization has made the world a global village with new

markets offering new challenges and opportunities, especially

in China, India, Brazil, and Russia. Global issues like trade

barriers, exchange rates, tariffs, and distribution have become

important elements of managerial choice.

Technology has increased access, accessibility, visibility, and

connection. The connected world is smaller, rapidly changing,

and has more open information.

Employees represent increasingly diverse demographic

backgrounds including not only race and gender, but personal

preferences, global or cultural backgrounds, and orientation to

work.

Changing Business Context

In some parts of the world, employees are aging more than in

others. Employee expectations are constantly rising as they

gain in education and skills. Customers have become

increasingly segmented, literate, and demanding.

As they have greater choice, they become more selective

about with whom they work. Investors have become

increasingly attuned to and actively concerned about not only

financial results, but intangibles. Competitors come from both

traditional, large global players and increasingly smaller

innovators.

Changing Business Context

HRM’s legacy was to monitor terms and conditions of work

through industrial relations, then to design systems and

practices that shape how people are treated in an

organization.

With this orientation, HRM professionals had little reason to

be more than casual observers of business trends. Now, the

HRM profession is being asked to help businesses compete,

and to do so, HRM must not only observe, but understand

and adapt to these business trends.

Changing Business Context

To respond to the business context, organizations need to
be good at:

Shared Mindset SpeedTalentOrganization

Responses

HRM must not only observe but understand and adapt to these business trends.

Business Trends

Organization capabilities and implications for HRM –
TALENT
We are good at ensuring competent and committed people.

Organization Capability

Attract, motivate, retain, engage competent employees

HRM should be able to

Do talent audit of what is and is not necessary

Build an employee value proposition that engages

talented employees

Organization capabilities and implications for HRM –
SPEED
We are good at making important changes fast

Organization Capability

Change quickly to align with customer needs

• New markets

• New products

• New employee contacts

• New business processes

HRM should be able to

Build and enact a disciplined change process

Assimilate change into a new identity

Organization capabilities and implications for HRM –
SHARED MINDSET
We are good at ensuring customers & employees have positive images and experiences with the organization.

Organization Capability

Build a culture that reflects customer expectations and

turns them into employee actions

HRM should be able to

Perform a cultural audit

Make customer reputation real to employees

Leadership Learning CollaborationAccountability

HRM must not only observe, but understand and adapt to these business trends.

Business Trends

Organization capabilities and implications for HRM –
ACCOUNTABILITY
We are good at implementing disciplines that result in high performance.

Organization Capability

Meet commitments and do what it says it will do

HRM should be able to

Build and implement a disciplined performance

management system

Follow up to ensure consequences

Organization capabilities and implications for HRM –
COLLABORATION
We are good at working across boundaries to ensure both efficiency & leverage.

Organization Capability

Make the whole more than the parts

HRM should be able to

Increase efficiency through productivity

improvement efforts

Increase leverage by sharing ideas, people,

products, services

Organization capabilities and implications for HRM –
LEARNING
We are good at generating and generalizing ideas with impact.

Organization Capability

Generate new ideas and then generalize those ideas

across boundaries

HRM should be able to

Generate new ideas by experimenting, acquiring skills,

continuous improvement, benchmarking

Generalize ideas across boundaries

Organization capabilities and implications for HRM –
LEADERSHIP
We are good at embedding leaders throughout the organization who deliver results.

Organization Capability

Identify a leadership brand that connects customer

reputation and employee behaviours

HRM should be able to

Ensure that leaders demonstrate the leadership code

Prepare a statement of leadership brand and invest in

future leaders

Efficiency Strategic Unity Innovation Customer

Connection

HRM must not only observe, but understand and adapt to these business trends.

Business Trends

Organization capabilities and implications for HRM –
CUSTOMER CONNECTION
We are good at building enduring relationships of trust with targeted customers.

Organization Capability

Identify and target the customers that are critical for

the firm to compete and win.

HRM should be able to

Involve customers in the firm’s HRM practices e.g.,

staffing

training

communications

Expose employees to external customers

Establish dedicated account teams

Organization capabilities and implications for HRM –
INNOVATION
We are good at doing something new in both content and process.

Organization Capability

Innovate and create new ways to do things

HRM should be able to

Establish an innovation protocol that helps shape new

ideas

Instill a spirit of innovation among all employees

Organization capabilities and implications for HRM
– STRATEGIC UNITY/CLARITY
We are good at articulating and sharing a strategic point of view.

Organization Capability

Envision a future state and ensure that employees and

practices are aligned to it

HRM should be able to

Establish a process to ensure strategic clarity

Align organization actions to make the strategy

happen

Organization capabilities and implications for HRM –
EFFICIENCY
We are good at managing costs of the operation.

Organization Capability

Work to reduce costs

HRM should be able to

Increase productivity

Manage processes efficiently

Allocate resources on key projects

100% of the Organization
Capabilities is dependent on it’s People

Abilities.

Did you know?

HRM Responses
FOR HRM TO DELIVER, THERE MUST BE CHANGE ACROSS…

HRM Profession

• Technical elements only the ticket of admission

• Business topics and organization capabilities

HRM Responses
FOR HRM TO DELIVER, THERE MUST BE CHANGE ACROSS…

HRM Department or Function

• Transactional versus strategic

• Embedded

• Centres of expertise

• Operational execution

• Corporate

HRM Responses
FOR HRM TO DELIVER, THERE MUST BE CHANGE ACROSS

HRM Practices

Deliver value to customer

Aligned

Integrated

More of them

HRM Responses
FOR HRM TO DELIVER, THERE MUST BE CHANGE ACROSS

HRM Professionals

• New role – technical expertise

• applied to business performance

• Need new competencies

HRM Responses
FOR HRM TO DELIVER, THERE MUST BE CHANGE ACROSS

HRM Issues

• HRMM is a shared responsibility

with line managers

• Line managers are the ultimate

owner of the workplace

To address those challenges, The RBL
Group developed their research

originally asking four key questions

✓ What makes a successful HRM professional?

We want to state with clarity and evidence the

knowledge, skills, and values that successful

HRM professionals demonstrate in all types of

positions, companies, and geographies.

✓ Which HRM competencies have the most

impact on the performance of the HRM

professional? We want to prioritize what HRM

professionals should know and do as they try to

deliver value. Being equally good at all things

generally means being excellent at nothing.

Being average is the enemy of great, and we

want to identify where HRM professionals

should be great.

Key Research Questions

✓ How do HRM competencies affect business performance? We believe

that in knowledge and service economics, organization and people issues

become key to long-term success. HRM professionals who have

competencies to architect, coach, design, and facilitate organization and

people issues will help their organization succeed.

✓ How much do HRM departments affect business vs. individuals who

work in HRM? In this round of study, we wanted to not only identify

competencies for HRM professionals, but governance of HRM

departments.

Key Research Questions

HRM Do not
operate in
vacuum!

Research findings will be discussed and used to show the
intertwining relation between HRM and Business success, more
over HRM Competencies and business growth.

Let’s Look at Amazon!

Students learn to deliver their expertise in various human resource disciplines in ways that directly support the business goals of organizations analyzing
business needs, developing metrics to support recommendations and evaluate programs. They use specific human resource competencies to add value to
organizations through human resource initiatives. Students develop the skills of a business partner whose expertise is welcomed and rewarded by organizations
for whom they work. These skills have been identified through comprehensive research as those that distinguish successful human resource professionals; this
entails the use of technical expertise in the traditional human resource disciplines, as well as, mastery of an additional group of human resource competencies
that enable them to support and be seen to support the strategic imperatives of their organization. Learning experiences will include case analyses, field
research, lecture, role play, group work and presentations. The course will begin by analyzing broader business cases rather than human resource issues;
learners identify ways their expertise can contribute to meeting business needs. Learners will also explore and practice the domains in the delivery of human
resources expertise to organizations. A capstone group presentation is made recommending a human resources initiative in a business setting.

Strategic HRM Competencies

Copyrights Disclaimer

A majority of the course lectures and materials provided in class and posted in SLATE are protected by
Copyright. Use of these materials must comply with the Acceptable Use Policy, Use of Copyright Protected
Work Policy and Student Code of Conduct. Students may use, copy these materials for learning and/or
research purposes provided that the use complies with fair dealing and the Copyright Act, Permission from
the rights holder would be necessary otherwise.
It is prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is not your own on third-party commercial websites for
profit or non for profit. It is also prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is not your own, It is also
prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is your own work with the intent to assist others in cheating
on third-party commercial websites.

By clicking to go to the next slide you are acknowledging reading, understanding and approving to the
above!

This Course is not for everyone. It is not HR for
Dummies . It is not for those who are afraid of lots
of data, Numbers, and Metrics It is not for those
who want a quick dip in the fountain of HRM
knowledge so they can catch the next wave.

CAUTION!

Module 2

Organizational Needs Analysis
(non textbook material)

An Organizational Needs Analysis may be defined as is an effective
way to identify skills, competencies, and Capabilities gaps. It involves
gathering information to identify areas where your employees can
improve their performance to their benefit and that of your business.

Evaluating and reexamining -Using Metrics-
proposed implementation plan

Create alternatives and recommendations,
and an implementation plan addressing
identified business problems

Identify and define business problem/s

Understand and Analyze the Business
Performance 04

03

02

01

Module Learning Objectives

Organizational Needs Analysis

Create alternatives and recommendations, and an
implementation plan addressing identified business problems

Identify and define business problem/s

Understand and Analyze the Business Performance

Agenda

Evaluating and reexamining -Using Metrics- proposed
implementation plan

The Company Overview is a brief
summary of the intended business,
including what it uniquely delivers, the
mission, how it got started, market
positioning, operational structure, and
financial goals. After reviewing this
section, the reader should have a
broad understanding of what the
business is setting out to do and how
it is organized.

Understand and
Analyze the Business
Performance

Organization History (WHY)

Organization Objectives and Structure

Organization Performance SWOT (HOW)

Stake Holders Analysis

The organization History answers the
following questions:

 When was the organization
established?

 Where Was it Established?

 How Was it Established?

 Who Established it?

 And the most important question is
WHY (the Purpose) was it
established?

Organization History
(WHY)

Every organization comprises of
people who run it. These people share
common goals and objectives. In
order to achieve them, these people
also share roles and responsibilities
with each other. An organizational
structure is simply the pattern or
network of division of these roles and
responsibilities.

Organization
Objectives and
Structure Strategic Leaders

Leaders of Managers

Managers of Others

Individual Contributors

SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses,
opportunities and threats analysis) is a
framework for identifying and
analyzing the internal and external
factors that can have an impact on the
viability of a project, product, place or
person.

Organization
Performance SWOT
(HOW)

Stakeholder analysis is the process of
assessing a system and potential
changes to it as they relate to relevant
and interested parties. This
information is used to assess how the
interests of those stakeholders should
be addressed in a project plan, policy,
program, or other action.

Stake Holders
Analysis

Other ways to understand
the business

The Business Analysis
Core Concept Model®

Business Analysis Core Concept
Model and BABOK are trademarks
owned by the International Institute
of Business Analysis.

Understanding /
Analyzing the Business
The 4 Most Important
Financial Metrics

Watch the video, Phil T. will take you
through it in seven minutes.

Financial metrics are the key numbers
that you can focus on in financial
statements. There are three financial
statements, the balance sheet, the
income statement and the cash flow that
we like to look at to find important
metrics.

Understanding /
Analyzing the Business
Balance Sheet

Watch the video, Phil T. will take you
through it in five minutes.
Using a Balance Sheet to Analyze a
Company

Balance sheets are one of the 3
financial statements that we use to
measure the value of a company. A
balance sheet gives the value of all of
the assets and liabilities in a company,
and shows the difference between the
two as equity.

The term “human resources” may refer
to five different subjects.

While Studying this course let’s
introduce you to what is meant with
HRM

Identify and define
business problem/s

Problem Definition

Finding a Problem

Drafting a Problem Statement

Creative Problem Solving (CPS)

“A matter or situation regarded as
unwelcome or harmful and needing

to be dealt with and overcome.”
Problem Definition

Amazon Reported Earnings for Q1
Where is the Problem?

Q1 2019

• Revenue of $59.7 billion
• Net income of $3.6 billion
• Earnings per share of $7.09

Source:https://venturebeat.com/2020/04/30/amazon-earnings-q1-2020/

Q1 2020

• Revenue of $75.5 billion
• Net income of $2.5 billion
• Earnings per share of $5.01

Amazon Reported Earnings (what if)
Where is the Problem?

Q1 2019

• Revenue of $59.7
billion

• Net income of
$3.6 billion

• Earnings per
share of $7.09

Q1 2020

• Revenue of $75.5
billion

• Net income of
$2.5 billion

• Earnings per
share of $5.01

• Revenue of $80
billion

• Net income of
$1.5 billion

• Earnings per
share of $4.09

Q2 2020

Problem Definition

The Problem Definition Tool helps
you clarify you priorities by focusing
on key critical issues.

Verification Vs. Validation

• Are you Answering the
Questions Correctly

• Are you Answering the Correct
Question

Defining the Problem

When working in the engineering
field, we aren’t necessarily always
thinking of problem solving and
problem definition in this way.
Throughout your career you will be
asked to work on different projects
that are not fully defined. Those
projects will also need to be
accomplished within a specific time
frame and within budget. This can
compromise the decision-making
process to explore solutions
prematurely before clearly
understanding the problem.

Creative Problem Solving

What is Creative
Problem Solving?

Creative problem-solving is the
mental process of searching for an
original and previously unknown
solution to a problem. To qualify,
the solution must be novel and
reached independently.

The creative problem-solving
process was originally developed by
Alex Osborn and Sid Parnes

The term “human resources” may refer
to five different subjects.

While Studying this course let’s
introduce you to what is meant with
HRM

Alternatives,
recommendations,
implementation plan

Generating Alternatives

Crafting Recommendations

Constructing an Implementation Plan

A choice limited to one of two or more possibilities, as of
things, propositions, or courses of action, the selection of
which precludes any other possibility

The Alternatives section is where you will put forward all
possible ideas to help the organization with it’s pre
identified problem in the previous section (Organization
Review),

Alternatives could be addressing business, management,
HRM, or other initiatives/solutions, depending on several
PESTEL Environment factors, as well as the type, size,
industry, results, stability of the organization.

Picture is courtesy of the alternative Limb Project
http://www.thealternativelimbproject.com/

Generating
Alternatives

A suggestion or proposal as to the best course of action,
The Recommendations section is where you will narrow
down your previously discussed alternatives to a fewer
number usually two – four meaningful recommendations
that you are recommending for the organization to focus
on.

While doing so, make sure that your recommendations
are in direct relation to the discussed alternatives in the
previous section, the below are examples of what might
be an acceptable recommendations criterion

Crafting
Recommendations

An implementation plan breaks each
recommendation/strategy into
identifiable steps, assigns each step to
one or more people and suggests
when each step will be completed.

Answering the 7 Key Questions:
Who, What, Why, When, Where,
How, How Much?

Constructing an
Implementation Plan

The term “human resources” may refer
to five different subjects.

While Studying this course let’s
introduce you to what is meant with
HRM

Evaluating and
reexamining -Using
Metrics- proposed
implementation plan

Continues Improvement

Using Business & HRM Metrics

A continual improvement process, also
often called a continuous
improvement process, is an ongoing
effort to improve products, services, or
processes. These efforts can seek
“incremental” improvement over time
or “breakthrough” improvement all at
once.

Continues
Improvement

Human Resource metrics are
measurements used to determine the
value and effectiveness of HR
initiatives, typically including such
areas as turnover, training, return on
human capital, costs of labor, and
expenses per employee

Using Business &
HRM Metrics

  • Strategic HRM Competencies
  • Slide Number 2
  • CAUTION!
  • Organizational Needs Analysis �(non textbook material)
  • Module Learning Objectives
  • Agenda
  • Understand and Analyze the Business Performance
  • Organization History (WHY)
  • Organization Objectives and Structure
  • Organization Performance SWOT (HOW)
  • Stake Holders Analysis�
  • Other ways to understand the business
  • The Business Analysis Core Concept Model®��
  • Understanding / Analyzing the Business�The 4 Most Important Financial Metrics
  • Understanding / Analyzing the Business�Balance Sheet
  • Identify and define business problem/s
  • Slide Number 17
  • “A matter or situation regarded as unwelcome or harmful and needing to be dealt with and overcome.”
  • Amazon Reported Earnings for Q1 �Where is the Problem?
  • Amazon Reported Earnings (what if)�Where is the Problem?
  • Problem Definition�
  • Verification Vs. Validation
  •  Defining the Problem�
  • Creative Problem Solving
  • Slide Number 25
  • What is Creative Problem Solving?�
  • Alternatives, recommendations, implementation plan
  • Generating Alternatives
  • Crafting Recommendations
  • Constructing an Implementation Plan
  • Evaluating and reexamining -Using Metrics- proposed implementation plan
  • Continues Improvement
  • Using Business & HRM Metrics
  • Slide Number 34

Students learn to deliver their expertise in various human resource disciplines in ways that directly support the business goals of
organizations analyzing business needs, developi ng metrics to support recommendations and evaluate progra ms. They use specific
huma n resource competencies to add value to organizations through huma n resource initiatives. Students develop the skills of a
business partner whose expertise is welcomed and rewarded by organizations for whom they work. T hese skills have been i dentified
through comprehensive research as those that distinguish successful human resource professionals; this entails the use of technical
expertise in the tradi tional human resource disciplines, as well as, mastery of an additional group of human resource competencies
that enable them to support a nd be seen to support the strategic imperatives of thei r organization. Learning experiences will include
case analyses, field research, lecture, role play, group work a nd presenta tions. The course will begin by analyzi ng broader business
cases rather than human resource issues; learners identify ways their expertise can contribute to meeti ng business needs. Learners
will also explore and practice the domains in the delivery of human resources expertise to organizations. A capstone group
presentation is made recommending a human resources initiative in a business setting.

Strategic HRM Competencies

Copyrights Disclaimer

A majority of the course lectures and materials provided in class and posted in SLATE are protected by
Copyright. Use of these materials must comply with the Acceptable Use Policy, Use of Copyright Protected
Work Policy and Student Code of Conduct. Students may use, copy these materials for learning and/or
research purposes provided that the use complies with fair dealing and the Copyright Act, Permission from
the rights holder would be necessary otherwise.
It is prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is not your own on third-party commercial websites for
profit or non for profit. It is also prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is not your own, It is also
prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is your own work with the intent to assist others in cheating
on third-party commercial websites.

By clicking to go to the next slide you are acknowledging reading, understanding and approving to the
above!

Module 9

Building An HRM Department – In A Post-
Covid-19 Business Environment

Our focus here is 2-dimensional: 1. Recognizing that the HR department is more than the
sum of the isolated individuals. 2. Positioning the HR department to ‘manage’ the
‘business of people’ in the post – Covid 19 environment.

3- Transforming HR

2- Guiding Principals and Questions

1- Building An HRM Department

Agenda

Building An HR Department

Today’s
discussion is all
about bringing
it together!

Everything you studied so far will
come to play into today’s session!

What Difference would it make?

Established
Organization

Newly Established
Organization

Have HRM
Dept/Functions

Don’t Have HRM
Dept/Functions

HRM Dept.

I Like My HR Person, But I don’t
like the HR Department !

Operating as a Business within the Business! What Does this Mean?

I Like My physician, But I don’t
like the Hospital!

Operating as a Business within the Business!
What Does this Mean?

Mission Vision Purpose Strategy
Organizat

ional
Structure

Job
analysis
for each

job

# of
Employe

es per
Job

/Position

Building an HR Department:
Four Key (Research) Questions

• How Important is the HR Department in helping the business perform better?

1

• Which Stakeholders should the HR department serve to increase business
performance?

2

• Where Should an HR Department focus to increase business performance
(generally)?

3

• [Adapted] – What HR Practices should be prioritized so that the HR Department can
contribute to organization re-building and restructuring post Covid-19?

4

How to Increase Business
Performance

• HR leaders need to insist on creating a value-added HR
department by focusing on all stakeholders: internal and
external. These include:

• Employees – include investing in HR in ways that allow
employees to meet their need through the
organization

• Line managers

• External customers

• Community – includes social responsibility and
sustainability

• Investors – include factors that build intangible value
such as confidence in leadership, speed to market,
customer service, innovation, and culture.

Building a value-added department necessitates an HR
transformation plan.

Steps in Building a Transformation Plan
• Diagnose business strategy and organization.

• Align HR and business organization structures.

• Audit the HR department.

• Create a project team.

• Blueprint the transformation.

• Monitor progress.

Steps in Building a Transformation
Plan – Steps 1- 2

Step 1: diagnose business strategy and organization

• HR must have a clear understanding of the organization’s
business strategy, and corporate strategy

Step 2: align HR and business organization structures

• The overall direction of HR must be set such that the
correct elements can be put in place to match the business-
type.

Steps in Building a Transformation Plan –
Steps 3- 4

Step 3: audit the HR
department

• Create a checklist to measure HR’s
performance on the key indictors
that create value-added

Step 4: create a project team

• Setting up transformation
parameters is too much work for 1
person; set up a team comprised of
representatives of the key
stakeholders.

Steps in
Building a
Transformation
Plan – Steps 5 –
6

Monitor

monitor progress

• Quantitative measures – HR staff ratios, budgets.

• Qualitative measures – employee satisfaction

Blueprint

blueprint the transformation

• As the team builds a transformation process,
prepare a blueprint – to guide the process and for
future reference

What Difference would it make?

Established
Organization

Newly Established
Organization

Have HRM
Dept/Functions

Don’t Have HRM
Dept/Functions

HRM Dept.

Transforming HR – Post Covid-19 Strategy

Transforming
HR – Post
Covid-19 –
Why

The reactive novelty of
transferring the ‘workplace’ to
‘home’, has worn off. Reality says
the situation (i.e. persistence of
the pandemic) calls for a more
strategic plan for workplace
operations…including revising the
organization’s strategic plan.

Transforming HR – Post Covid-19 – What

Recovery playbook

• The priority for organizations was crisis management: ensuring the
health and safety of employees

• Now, workplaces must devise a recovery plan: the biggest challenge is
the tension between getting back to work and rethinking work as
they embrace a new reality

Transforming HR
– Post Covid-19
– How

• HR department will be involved
in rethinking work, workforces,
and workplaces

• HR should be designed for speed,
new ways of working, digital first,
teams, adaptable organizational
strategies, and changing business
requirements

Transforming HR –
Post Covid-19 – Who

Who do you think should be involved?

What Questions do you have?

Students learn to deliver their expertise in various human resource disciplines in ways that directly support the business goals of organizations analyzing
business needs, developing metrics to support recommendations and evaluate programs. They use specific human resource competencies to add value to
organizations through human resource initiatives. Students develop the skills of a business partner whose expertise is welcomed and rewarded by organizations
for whom they work. These skills have been identified through comprehensive research as those that distinguish successful human resource professionals; this
entails the use of technical expertise in the traditional human resource disciplines, as well as, mastery of an additional group of human resource competencies
that enable them to support and be seen to support the strategic imperatives of their organization. Learning experiences will include case analyses, field
research, lecture, role play, group work and presentations. The course will begin by analyzing broader business cases rather than human resource issues;
learners identify ways their expertise can contribute to meeting business needs. Learners will also explore and practice the domains in the delivery of human
resources expertise to organizations. A capstone group presentation is made recommending a human resources initiative in a business setting.

Strategic HRM Competencies

Copyrights Disclaimer

A majority of the course lectures and materials provided in class and posted in SLATE are protected by
Copyright. Use of these materials must comply with the Acceptable Use Policy, Use of Copyright Protected
Work Policy and Student Code of Conduct. Students may use, copy these materials for learning and/or
research purposes provided that the use complies with fair dealing and the Copyright Act, Permission from
the rights holder would be necessary otherwise.
It is prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is not your own on third-party commercial websites for
profit or non for profit. It is also prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is not your own, It is also
prohibited to reproduce and/or post a work that is your own work with the intent to assist others in cheating
on third-party commercial websites.

By clicking to go to the next slide you are acknowledging reading, understanding and approving to the
above!

Module 3

Credible Activist Domain

Credible Activists are respected and proactive. Credible individuals
who are not activists may be respected, but have little impact.
Activists who are not credible may have good ideas, but no one
listens to them. The matrix below represents these two dimensions in
graphic form.

4. Credible Activist Domain Personal Application

3. Credible Activist Domain Business Application

2. Credible Activist Domain Factors

1. Credible Activist Domain Definition

Agenda

Apply the domain in a professional setting

Apply the domain in a professional setting

Understand the discussed domain

03

02

01

Module Learning Objectives

Jason F. the New V.P. HRM

Jason Frank was recently appointed vice
president of HR for a bank. He was actively
courted by his new company and offered a
large signing bonus to leave his former
employer where he headed compensation.
After two months in his new position, he met
with the bank president to discuss his plans to
reorganize HR. After listening carefully, the
president said, “I like your aggressiveness. But
you are new to the company and industry, so
let’s not make any changes until you have had
more time to learn about us and build stronger
relationships. We’ll talk again in a few
months.”

Why did the President this
way to Jason’s Plans?

Paivi H. Not the one!

Paivi Hansen leads training for the research and
development (R&D) division of a global
consumer products company, and is respected
both in HR and by business partners. She has
20 years with the company, all in training.
Recently, the head of corporate training retired
and, despite Paivi’s experience, someone else
was offered the job. She has considered
looking at other employment opportunities.
The head of HR told her, “Paivi, we don’t want
you to leave but the top training job needs
someone willing to take more initiative. That’s
not you.”

Why did the Head of HRM
this way to Paivi’s Plans?

What are the similarities and
differences between Jason and

Paivi’s scenarios?

 Credible Activists are both
Respected and Proactive,

 Credible individuals who are
not activists may be respected,
but have little impact

 Activists who are not credible
may have good ideas but no
one listens to them

Credible Activists

less Credible More Credible

More Activist Risk of being seen as
impetuous, arrogant, or
uninformed

Opportunity to have impact

Less Activist Risk of being seen as a
marginal or poor performer

Risk of being seen as
irrelevant, not having
anything to say, resting on
past laurels, or not knowing
the business

Credible Activist Domain Factors

Delivering results with integrity

Sharing information

Building relationships of trust

Doing HR with an attitude

1. Delivering results with
integrity

 Focus on meeting pre-negotiated or
pre-stated commitments

 Strive to be error free
 Ask important questions that help to

frame complex ideas in useful ways
 Achieve results without violating

moral principles or compromising on
ethics and values

 Take responsibility for actions and
their consequences

2. Sharing information

 HR professionals gain and keep
credibility when they are able
to articulately and persuasively
communicate ideas to others

 To share or not to share, this is
the question.

Phil Megas Remains in the office!

Phil Megas (a fictional name) may be helpful. Phil is head of talent
management for a large technology company. He has a strong
technical background in his area of expertise and is up-to-date on
best practices. But he is an introvert and has difficulty building
relationships with senior executives. He would prefer to remain in
his office, reviewing the data and identifying needs and trends.
Phil doesn’t understand that his advisory and consulting skills, not
just his ability to draw insight from data, make or break his
reputation. right now, his reputation is showing serious stress
fractures. Unless he can become an active communicator and
establish effective working relationships with his company’s
executive team, it will be difficult for him to be an effective
consultant and advisor.

3. Building relationships of trust

 Core values are shared

 Common interests are shared that
extend beyond work boundaries

 HR professional is empathetic in
addressing concerns that may not
be directly work-related

 HR professional can decompress
tense interpersonal issues

4. Doing HR with an attitude

 Taking appropriate risks, both personally and
for the organization

 Providing candid observations. HR
professionals have a unique and needed point
of view

 Influencing others

 Not waiting for problems to find you

 Anticipating problems increases your
credibility and puts you in the role to help the
business devise innovative solutions

Complete the below Sentence

McDonald’s is famous for …

McDonald’s is not known for …

Complete the below Sentence

HR is famous for …

HR is not known for …

They seek and accept accountability
for outcomes

They know the business and have a
point of view about how they can help
the business prosper

They do “HR with an attitude”

What characterizes Credible
Activists

What characterizes Credible Activists

They invest in relationships and relationship skills

They communicate frequently and powerfully

They take appropriate risks

What Questions do you still have?

Application

  • Strategic HRM Competencies
  • Slide Number 2
  • Credible Activist Domain
  • Agenda
  • Module Learning Objectives
  • Slide Number 6
  • Jason F. the New V.P. HRM
  • Why did the President this way to Jason’s Plans?
  • Paivi H. Not the one!
  • Why did the Head of HRM this way to Paivi’s Plans?
  • What are the similarities and differences between Jason and Paivi’s scenarios?
  • Credible Activists
  • Slide Number 13
  • Credible Activist Domain Factors
  • 1. Delivering results with integrity
  • 2. Sharing information
  • Phil Megas Remains in the office!
  • 3. Building relationships of trust
  • 4. Doing HR with an attitude
  • Complete the below Sentence
  • Complete the below Sentence
  • What characterizes Credible Activists
  • What characterizes Credible Activists
  • What Questions do you still have?
  • Application

May 2021

History of HR
Competency
Models
HR Competency Study (HRCS)

2

C O – S P O N S O R S

1987 1992 1997 2002 2007 2012 2016 2021

3

1987 HR Competency Model

4

1992 HR Competency Model

5

1997 HR Competency Model

6

2002 HR Competency Model

7

2007 HR Competency Model

8

2012 HR Competency Model

9

2016 HR Competency Model

10

2021 HR Competency Model

Michigan, RBL, and many global partners over the eight rounds: HR competency studies
Round 1

1987
Round 2

1992
Round 3

1997
Round 4

2002
Round 5

2007
Round 6

2012
Round 7

2016
Round 8

2021 (5 domains)
Round 8

2021 (13 sub factors)
Total respondents 10,291 4,556 3,229 9,182 10,063 20,023 31,868 28,627
Business units 1,200 441 678 692 413 635 1,395 1,013
Associate raters 8,884 3,805 2,565 5,890 8,414 17,385 27,904 21,647
HR participants 1,407 751 664 1,192 1,671 2,638 3,964 3,594

[1]
Business

Business Knowledge
(3.17)

Business Knowledge
(3.28)

Business Knowledge
(3.27)

Business Knowledge
(3.44)

Business Ally
(3.50)

Strategic Positioner
(3.89) Strategic Positioner

(4.13)

Accelerates Business
(3.84)

Generates Competitive
Insights
(3.90)

Strategic Contribution
(3.65)

Strategic architect
(3.68)

Influences the Business
(3.88)

Gets the Right Things
Done
(3.80)

[2]
Human Resources Tools

HR delivery
(3.33)

HR delivery
(3.41)

HR delivery
(3.49)

HR Delivery
(3.69)

Talent manager &
organization designer

(3.80)

HR Innovator &
Integrator

(3.90)

(4.02)
Human Capital Curator

(4.01)

Advances human
Capabilities

(3.84)

Elevates Talent
(3.83)

Delivers HR Solutions
(3.84)

Champions Diversity,
Equity, Inclusion

(3.87)

Total Rewards Steward
(3.88)

[3]
HR Information,
Analysis,
Operations

HR Technology
(3.02)

Operational executor
(3.53)

Technology or
Information Proponent

(3.74)

Technology and Media
Integrator

(3.92)

Mobilizes Information
(3.67 )

Leverages Information
and Technology

(3.74)

Guides Social Agenda
(3.50)

Compliance Manager
(4.32)

Analytics Designer and
Interpreter

(4.01)

[4]
Change

Change
(3.65)

Change
(3.68)

Change
(3.68)

Change and Culture
were combined into

strategic contribution
(3.65)

Culture and steward
(3.80)

Change Champion
(3.93)

(4.01)
Culture and Change

Champion
(4.03)

Simplifies Complexity
3.84

Drives Agility
(3.76)

Thinks Critically
(3.80)

Harnesses Uncertainty
(3.91)

Builds Relationships
(4.17)

[5]
Organization and Culture

Culture
(3.42)

Organization Capability
builder
(3.97) Paradox Navigator

(3.99)

[6]
Personal

Personal Credibility
(3.78)

Personal Credibility
(4.03)

Personal Credibility
(4.13)

Credible Activist
(4.19)

Credible Activist
(4.23)

Credible Activist
(4.33)

Fosters Collaboration
4.14

Manages Self
(4.09)

Thank You.

Learn how to implement the findings from
Round 8 of HR Competency Study (HRCS)

May 2021

AcceleratingBusiness
throughAdvancing
HumanCapability:
Research Insights and Practical Solutions from the HR
Competency (HRCS) Round 8

2

To: HR Associations, Participants, Associates, and …

谢谢

3

C O – S P O N S O R S

1987 1992 1997 2002 2007 2012 2016 2021

Round 8

4

HR Competence Study (HRCS) History: 1987 to ???

Impact
• 5 PhD dissertations

• 7 books

• 100s of articles and
HR transformations

• 1,000s of presentations

• 10,000s of 360s

• 100,000s of HR
professional development

5

Current context of the world

What are the contextual events
facing your world today?

Content is king Context is kingdom

Context

7

Navigating
HR’s Impact

Now is the time for HR… navigating HR’s impact

THREAT
DISCOVERING
OPPORTUNITY

Focus on weakness
and what’s wrong

Focus on human
capability contributions

What can YOU do as an HR professional to make a difference?

8

HRCS Round 8
Research team

• Mike Ulrich, Co-Director
• Pat Wright, Co-Director
• Erin Burns, Co-Director
• Scott DeRue, Co-Director
• Kaylene Allsop, Project Manager
• Dave Ulrich, Advisor
• Wayne Brockbank, Advisor

9

How to navigate HR’s impact post 2020/21 crises?

What competencies do you need to deliver personal,
stakeholder, and business results?

3 Which business capabilities should you help create to deliver business results?

What should be the characteristics of an effective HR department?

Today, we will focus on the following questions:

2

1

10

How to navigate
HR’s impact post
2020/21 crises?

11

1. What competencies
do you need to deliver
personal, stakeholder,
and business results?

12

2. What should be the
characteristics of an
effective HR department?

13

3. Which business
capabilities should you
help create to deliver
business results?

14

1. What competencies do you need to deliver
personal, stakeholder, and business results?

2. What should be the characteristics
of an effective HR department?

3. Which business capabilities should you
help create to deliver business results?

HRCS Round 8: How to navigate
HR’s impact post 2020/21 crises?

15

HRCS Round 8 Partner Associations

16

Respondents by Global Region

17

Total
Sample:
28,627

Participant Demographics

Total # of
Organizations:
1,013

18

Organizational Demographics

19

Respondents by Industry

20

Start with results

21

Three results you care about

How does your business
compare to its
competitors?

How do you compare
against other HR
professionals?

How can you create
value for internal and
external stakeholders?

Personal
Effectiveness

BusinessStakeholder

22

Overview: Looking at the data

Attribute of individual, HR
department, or business

1 2 3

Mean
(1 to 5)

Individual Results
(N=3594)

Business Results
(N=1013)

A – Elocution

B – Applicability

C – Content Mastery

D – Design

E – Physical Appearance

3.8

4.1

3.8

3.6

3.2

25%

15%

30%

10%

20%

20%

35%

15%

15%

15%

30%60%–Overall Regression

Example: What does it take to give a good online presentation?

23

Overview: Looking at the data

Low
xx%

High
x.xx

Low
x.xx

E
ff

ec
tiv

en
es

s
M

ea
n

Business Impact High
xx%

Manage

Maintain Stay Focused

Prioritize

24

1. What competencies
do you need to deliver
personal, stakeholder,
and business results?

25

HR
COMPETENCIES

HRCS 2021: Round 8

26

HRCS 2021: Domain & Factors

Accelerates Business
• Generates Competitive Insights
• Influences the Business
• Gets the Right Things Done
• Drives Agility

27

HRCS 2021: Domain & Factors

Advances Human Capability
• Elevates Talent
• Delivers HR Solutions
• Champions Diversity,

Equity, and Inclusion

28

Mobilizes Information
• Leverages Information

and Technology
• Guides Social Agenda

HRCS 2021: Domain & Factors

29

HRCS 2021: Domain & Factors

Fosters Collaboration
• Manages Self
• Builds Relationships

30

Simplifies Complexity
• Thinks Critically
• Harnesses Uncertainty

HRCS 2021: Domain & Factors

31

HR Competencies Round 8
Competency Averages by Rater Type
Purpose: Show how average competency scores differ by rater type (Scale: 1-5)

1 2 3 4 5

ALL RATERS SELF-RATINGS HR ASSOCIATERATINGS

NON-HR
ASSOCIATE

RATINGS
SUPERVISORS

Accelerates Business 3.84 3.57 3.53 3.84 3.96

Advances Human Capability 3.84 3.54 3.58 3.82 3.97

Simplifies Complexity 3.83 3.58 3.58 3.82 3.97

Mobilizes Information 3.67 3.24 3.28 3.7 3.8

Fosters Collaboration 4.14 4.06 3.99 4.09 4.26

32

Poll

Which of these five competencies will most
help you be seen as personally effective?

1. Accelerates Business
2. Advances Human Capability
3. Simplifies Complexity
4. Mobilizes Information
5. Fosters Collaboration

33

HR Competencies and Results

*These columns sum to 100%, representing the percentage of explained variance in the model that can be explained by each variable category

1 2 3 4

Mean
Personal

Effectiveness
(N=3594)

Stakeholders: Value
created by the individual

(N=3594)
Business
Results

(N=1013)
Internal External

Accelerates Business 3.84 23% 23% 24% 23%

Advances Human Capability 3.84 19% 20% 19% 35%

Simplifies Complexity 3.83 21% 19% 19% 13%

Mobilizes Information 3.67 17% 17% 23% 16%

Fosters Collaboration 4.14 19% 21% 15% 14%

Overall Regression – 47.2% 45.5% 44% 3.5%

Path A: HR Competencies to Results

34

Prioritizing HR Competency Domains

Low
12%

High
4.14

Low
3.67

E
ff

ec
tiv

en
es

s
M

ea
n

Business Impact

4.2

4.1

4.0

3.9

3.8

3.7

3.6

12 23 35

High
35%

Accelerates
Business

Advances Human
Capability

Simplifies
Complexity

Mobilizes
Information

Fosters
Collaboration

35

Prioritizing HR Competency Factors

Low
5%

High
4.17

Low
3.5

E
ff

ec
tiv

en
es

s
M

ea
n

Business Impact

4.2

4.1

4.0

3.9

3.8

3.7

3.5

5 13

High
12.4%

Generates
Competitive Insights

Influences the Business

Gets the Right Things Done

Drives Agility

Elevates TalentDelivers HR Solutions

Champions Diversity,
Equity, and Inclusion

Thinks Critically

Harnesses Uncertainty

Leverages Data
and Technology

Guides Social Agenda

Manages Self
Builds Relationships

3.6

6 7 8 9 10 11 12

36

1. What competencies do you need to deliver
personal, stakeholder, and business results?

2

To deliver value to stakeholders, focus on mobilizing information and fostering collaboration.3

To build personal effectiveness, focus on simplifying complexity.

1 There are five key competencies HR professionals need to have.

To impact business results, focus on advancing human capability.4

37

What have I learned? What should I do?

2

Build competence in your HR Department3

Build your team’s competencies

1 Build your personal competency

38

2. What should be the
characteristics of an
effective HR department?

39

HR Department: What should be the
characteristics of an effective HR department?

• Employee Practices: HR policy/practices used for employees

• Practice Alignment: HR practices aligned to support development of key strategic capabilities

• Capability Support: HR department effectiveness at supporting capabilities

• Stakeholder Value: HR designs/delivers practices to add value to stakeholders

• HR Department Credibility: HR department is seen as credible

• Information and Analytics: HR accesses, acquires, and acts on information/analytics

• Reliance on HR: Organization relies on HR to provide insights

40

Poll

Which of these do you think has the
most impact on business performance?

1. Employee Practices
2. Practice Alignment
3. Capability Support
4. Stakeholder Value
5. HR Department Credibility
6. Information and Analytics
7. Reliance on HR

41

What should be the characteristics of an
effective HR department?

HR Department
Mean

Business
Results

(100)

Employee Practices: HR policy/practices used for employees (10 items) 3.51 23%

Practice Alignment: HR practices aligned to support development of key strategic capabilities (12 items) 3.84 12%

Capability Support: HR effectiveness at supporting capabilities (4 items) 3.86 19%

Stakeholder Value: HR designs/delivers practices to add value to stakeholders (5 items) 3.92 19%

HR Department Credibility: HR department is seen as credible (11 items) 3.79 8%

HR Information and Analytics: HR accesses, acquires, and acts on information/analytics (7 items) 3.59 12%

HR Reliance: Organization relies on HR to provide insights (9 items) 3.89 8%

Overall regression — 48.2%

Path B: HR Department and Impact on Business Results

42

Prioritizing HR competence actions

Low
8%

High
3.92

Low
3.51

E
ff

ec
tiv

en
es

s
M

ea
n

Business Impact

4.0

3.9

3.8

3.7

3.6

3.5

5 10 15 20 25

High
23%

Capability Support

Practice Alignment

Employee Practices

HR Department Credibility

HR Information and Analytics

Stakeholder Value

HR Reliance

43

How do my personal competencies make my
HR department more effective?

These are the three department activities that
have the most impact on business results. We are
showing how the 5 HR competencies affect these
three HR department activities.

1 2 3

Employee
practices

Capability
Support

Stakeholder
Value

Accelerates Business 24% 23% 22%

Advances Human Capability 34% 29% 22%

Simplifies Complexity 14% 15% 22%

Mobilizes Information 16% 15% 19%

Fosters Collaboration 12% 19% 15%

Path D: Competencies to HR Department

44

2. What should be the characteristics of an
effective HR department?

Organization is more important than talent in impacting business results…by a factor of 10!1

Demonstrates the critical need for HR Transformation to more effectively drive business results.2

Develop competencies in accelerating the business and advancing HC to know how to impact the
business through aligning HR practices with strategic capabilities.3

HR Competencies à HR Practices à Strategic Capabilities à Customer Value à Business Results. 4

45

What have I learned? What should I do?

2

Make sure all HR conversations about our practices focus on stakeholders and business capabilities. 3

Ensure I know what capabilities the business needs.

1 Use my competencies to understand our stakeholder demands.

46

3. Which business
capabilities should you
help create to deliver
business results?

47

Business Capabilities:
Which business capabilities should you help create to
deliver business results?

Aligning
Capability

What capabilities
help create strategic
differentiation?

Creating
Workforce Agility

How agile is
your workforce?

Delivering
DE&I

How well does your
organization support
a DE&I culture?

48

Which business capabilities should you help
create to deliver business results?

Business Capabilities
Mean

Business
Results

(100)

Aligning Capability (10 items) 3.96 44%

Creating Workforce Agility (6 items) 3.36 33%

Delivering DE&I (9 items) 4.16 23%

Overall regression — 48.3%

Path C: Business Capabilities and Impact on Results

49

How HR Competencies affect how business operates

HR competencies
(5 domains)

1 2 3

Aligning
Capabilities

Creating
Workforce

Agility

Delivering
DE&I

Accelerates Business 21% 20% 20%

Advances Human Capability 29% 31% 27%

Simplifies Complexity 12% 13% 20%

Mobilizes Information 27% 23% 15%

Fosters Collaboration 10% 13% 19%

Path E: HR Competencies to Business Capabilities

50

3. Which business capabilities should you help
create to deliver business results?

Businesses outperform competitors through aligning capabilities and agility.1

To help your company align capabilities with strategy, elevate talent, champion DEI, and guide social agenda.2

To help your company become agile, deliver HR solutions, elevate talent, champion DEI, and guide social agenda.3

Talk with your business leaders about the capabilities of the business and agility of the workforce.4

51

Summary: What have I learned? What should I do?

2

3

HR Department: What’s will discuss with your HR team in your next meeting?

1 HR Competencies: What will you do different in your job in the next 6 months?

Business Capabilities: What will you discuss with your business leader in your next meeting?

52

HR Department
• Employee Practices
• Practice Alignment
• Capability Support
• Stakeholder Value
• HR Department Credibility
• Information and Analytics
• Reliance on HR

Results
• Personal Effectiveness
• Stakeholder
• Business

Business Capabilities
• Aligning Capability
• Creating Workforce Agility
• Delivering DE&I
• Balancing Stakeholders

HR Competencies
• Accelerates Business
• Advances Human Capability
• Simplifies Complexity
• Mobilizes Information
• Fosters Collaboration

Path A: 3.5%

53

Results
• Personal Effectiveness
• Stakeholder
• Business

Business Capabilities
• Aligning Capability
• Creating Workforce Agility
• Delivering DE&I

HR Competencies
• Accelerates Business
• Advances Human Capability
• Simplifies Complexity
• Mobilizes Information
• Fosters Collaboration

Path B: 48.2%

HR Department
• Employee Practices
• Practice Alignment
• Capability Support
• Stakeholder Value
• HR Department Credibility
• Information and Analytics
• Reliance on HR

54

Results
• Personal Effectiveness
• Stakeholder
• Business

Business Capabilities
• Aligning Capability
• Creating Workforce Agility
• Delivering DE&I

HR Competencies
• Accelerates Business
• Advances Human Capability
• Simplifies Complexity
• Mobilizes Information
• Fosters Collaboration Path C: 48.3%

HR Department
• Employee Practices
• Practice Alignment
• Capability Support
• Stakeholder Value
• HR Department Credibility
• Information and Analytics
• Reliance on HR

55

Results
• Personal Effectiveness
• Stakeholder
• Business

HR Competencies
• Accelerates Business
• Advances Human Capability
• Simplifies Complexity
• Mobilizes Information
• Fosters Collaboration

Path B: 48.2%

HR Department
• Employee practices
• Practice Alignment
• Capability support
• Stakeholder value
• HR Department credibility
• Information and analytics
• Reliance on HR

Path A: 3.5%

Path C: 48.3%

Business Capabilities
• Aligning Capability
• Creating Workforce Agility
• Delivering DE&I

56

What do I do next?

Development
programs

• UM, AHREP
• RBL HR Academy
• Organization

Guidance System

More
Webinars

• Regional partners
• RBL

RBL
Repository

• White papers
• Articles
• Institute sessions

and forums
(June 29-30)

57

58

“I have been through many education experiences on my personal
and professional journey and this was the best! Seriously.”

– Director, Talent Management

+ The HR Academy

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Outcomes of HR
(Modules 3–8)

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modules over 8 weeks
• Weekly live facilitated session with

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• Public and private offerings: Next

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59

Leadership Brand

This survey assesses the overall quality of leadership. You
will assess your current ability to develop individual leaders
as well as your organization’s capability to develop
leadership and leaders at ever level. Power

of

The Organization Guidance System offers four assessments of human capability based on the decades of
research by University of Michigan Professor Dave Ulrich and Norm Smallwood. The RBL.ai web site
enables business and HR leaders to complete from one to all four assessments, and to invite many others
to also complete the assessments.

1 2

3 4

Organization Guidance System: Access your free report

Organizational Capability

This survey assesses organization capabilities: what the
organization is good at doing and known for.

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This survey assesses your organization’s talent management
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activities at four levels of maturity.

Go to www.rbl.ai
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60

To: HR Associations, Participants, Associates, and …

谢谢

Final Message

BEST
The

is yet AHEAD

Appendix

Michigan, RBL, and many global partners over the eight rounds: HR competency studies
Round 1

1987
Round 2

1992
Round 3

1997
Round 4

2002
Round 5

2007
Round 6

2012
Round 7

2016
Round 8

2021 (5 domains)
Round 8

2021 (13 sub factors)
Total respondents 10,291 4,556 3,229 9,182 10,063 20,023 31,868 28,627
Business units 1,200 441 678 692 413 635 1,395 1,013
Associate raters 8,884 3,805 2,565 5,890 8,414 17,385 27,904 21,647
HR participants 1,407 751 664 1,192 1,671 2,638 3,964 3,594

[1]
Business

Business Knowledge
(3.17)

Business Knowledge
(3.28)

Business Knowledge
(3.27)

Business Knowledge
(3.44)

Business Ally
(3.50)

Strategic Positioner
(3.89) Strategic Positioner

(4.13)

Accelerates Business
(3.84)

Generates Competitive
Insights
(3.90)

Strategic Contribution
(3.65)

Strategic architect
(3.68)

Influences the Business
(3.88)

Gets the Right Things
Done
(3.80)

[2]
Human Resources Tools

HR delivery
(3.33)

HR delivery
(3.41)

HR delivery
(3.49)

HR Delivery
(3.69)

Talent manager &
organization designer

(3.80)

HR Innovator &
Integrator

(3.90)

(4.02)
Human Capital Curator

(4.01)

Advances human
Capabilities

(3.84)

Elevates Talent
(3.83)

Delivers HR Solutions
(3.84)

Champions Diversity,
Equity, Inclusion

(3.87)

Total Rewards Steward
(3.88)

[3]
HR Information,
Analysis,
Operations

HR Technology
(3.02)

Operational executor
(3.53)

Technology or
Information Proponent

(3.74)

Technology and Media
Integrator

(3.92)

Mobilizes Information
(3.67 )

Leverages Information
and Technology

(3.74)

Guides Social Agenda
(3.50)

Compliance Manager
(4.32)

Analytics Designer and
Interpreter

(4.01)

[4]
Change

Change
(3.65)

Change
(3.68)

Change
(3.68)

Change and Culture
were combined into

strategic contribution
(3.65)

Culture and steward
(3.80)

Change Champion
(3.93)

(4.01)
Culture and Change

Champion
(4.03)

Simplifies Complexity
3.84

Drives Agility
(3.76)

Thinks Critically
(3.80)

Harnesses Uncertainty
(3.91)

Builds Relationships
(4.17)

[5]
Organization and Culture

Culture
(3.42)

Organization Capability
builder
(3.97) Paradox Navigator

(3.99)

[6]
Personal

Personal Credibility
(3.78)

Personal Credibility
(4.03)

Personal Credibility
(4.13)

Credible Activist
(4.19)

Credible Activist
(4.23)

Credible Activist
(4.33)

Fosters Collaboration
4.14

Manages Self
(4.09)

64

Results
• Personal Effectiveness
• Stakeholder
• Business

Business Capabilities
• Aligning Capability
• Creating Workforce Agility
• Delivering DE&I

HR Competencies
• Accelerates Business
• Advances Human Capability
• Simplifies Complexity
• Mobilizes Information
• Fosters Collaboration

HR Department
• Employee Practices
• Practice Alignment
• Capability Support
• Stakeholder Value
• HR Department Credibility
• Information and Analytics
• Reliance on HR

Thank You.

Learn how to implement the findings from
Round 8 of HR Competency Study (HRCS)

HRPA
Professional Competency Framework

Agenda

• Origin & Uses
• What is a Competency
• Different Types of Competencies
 Functional
 Enabling

• Q&A

ORIGIN
• In 2012/13, the Canadian Council of Human Resources

Associations worked with HR associations and subject
matter experts across Canada to develop a new
Competency Framework for Certified Human Resources
Professionals.

• HRPA participated in the development sessions. This work
culminated in the development of 44 functional tasks across
9 functional areas.

• Notwithstanding the excellent work resulting from the
CCHRA initiative, HRPA identified the need for additional
scope of detail for its purposes in Ontario.

USES

• This Competency Framework serves to inform the role,
function and services HRPA provides.

• It serves as the foundation for all credential
requirements.

• It can be used to establish education requirements, for
examination development, and for career planning.

USES

• This document is also valuable to employers and
employees because it sets out the reasonable
expectations for those working in HR roles.

• Educators can use the information provided here to
inform and build curriculum, and students and
candidates can use it to inform their preparations and
study.

• Finally, allied professionals can use the document as a
resource for the scope of practice of those working as
HR professionals.

“Competence is the set of
demonstrable characteristics
and skills that enable, and
improve the efficiency of,
performance of a job.”

WHAT IS A COMPETENCY?

WHAT IS A COMPETENCY?

A competency is a cluster of
related knowledge, skills, abilities,

and characteristics that are
related to the performance of a
significant aspect of the practice

of a profession.

A competency model is a
collection of competencies that

are relevant to the performance in
a particular job, job family, or

functional area.

A competency framework is a
broad framework for integrating,
organizing, and aligning various

competency models.

WHAT IS A COMPETENCY?
A competency

framework

A competency
model

A competency

WHAT IS A COMPETENCY?

• These behavioural indicators are
descriptions of what it looks like to
demonstrate a given competency.
Behavioural indicators have the following
characteristics:
 They are highly specific markers that, if

present, imply that the person has the
competency in question.

 They help set the degree and scope of
expectation for each level of HR
professional.

 They are examples of observable
behaviours

 Within a set (or cell, in the tables that
follow), they are not to be taken as an
exhaustive list.

WHAT IS A COMPETENCY?

• The HRPA Human Resources
Professional Competency Framework
recognizes two kinds of competencies—
functional competencies and enabling
competencies
 A functional competency relates to

the competence to perform tasks
that are within the scope of practice
of HR professionals.
 Enabling competencies are more

generic competencies that are not
specific to the performance of HR
tasks but are nonetheless required
for the performance of such tasks.

FUNCTIONAL AND ENABLING
COMPETENCIES

Does this sound familiar?

Mandatory Course Competencies
HRM Planning Strategy
Human Resources Management Professional Practice
Organizational Behavior Organizational Effectiveness
Labor Relations Labor & Employees Relations
Recruitment & Selection Workforce Planning & Talent Mgmt.
Compensation Management Total Rewards
HRM Accounting & finance HR Metrics, accounting and financial

mgmt.
Occupational Health & Safety Health, wellness &safe workplace
Training & Development Learning & Development

FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND
UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES

10 STRATEGY
• A cluster of competencies

related to the ability to
think and act strategically
in regard to organizations,
business, and the HR
function.

FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND
UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES

20 PROFESSIONAL
PRACTICE
• A cluster of

competencies related to
the ability to conduct
oneself in a professional
manner and to exhibit
high levels of
professionalism in all
contexts and situations.

FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND
UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES

30 ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS
• A cluster of competencies related to using the

levers available to HR professionals to maximize
the performance of organizations, teams, and
individuals within the context of executing the
organization’s strategy.

FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND
UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES

40 WORKFORCE
PLANNING AND TALENT
MANAGEMENT
• A cluster of competencies

related to the recruitment
and deployment of human
resources within an
organization.

FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND
UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES

50 LABOUR AND
EMPLOYEE RELATIONS
• A cluster of competencies

related to managing the
relationships between
employer and employees.

60 TOTAL REWARDS
• A cluster of

competencies related to
the management of
rewards within an
organization in a manner
that maximally supports
the execution of
organizational strategy.

FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND
UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES

FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND
UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES

70 LEARNING AND
DEVELOPMENT
• A cluster of competencies

related to the optimization
of the ability of the
organization, teams, and
individuals to acquire and
put to use new
competencies.

FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND
UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES

80 HEALTH, WELLNESS,
AND SAFE WORKPLACE
• A cluster of competencies

related to the creation and
maintenance of healthy and
safe workplaces.

FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND
UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
90 HUMAN RESOURCES
METRICS, REPORTING, AND
FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
• A cluster of competencies

related to the ability to collect,
manage, and synthesize
information relevant to the
management of human
resources and the ability to
incorporate financial analysis in
the making of decisions about
HR investments.

ENABLING COMPETENCIES

• INDIVIDUAL SKILLS
• TEAM SKILLS
• ORGANIZATIONAL SKILLS

ENABLING COMPETENCIES

• INDIVIDUAL SKILLS
 Critical thinking and analysis
 Technological savvy
 Research skills
 Quantitative skills
 Critical legal thinking

ENABLING COMPETENCIES

• TEAM SKILLS
 Emotional intelligence
 Project management
 Decision-making skills
 Business acumen
 Independence

ENABLING COMPETENCIES

• ORGANIZATIONAL
SKILLS
 Ethical behaviour and

professionalism
 Relationship management
 Negotiation and influencing
 Strategic and organizational

leadership
 Integration

FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND
UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
• The calibre of a profession is measured by the quality of

its designations: M.D., P.Eng., CPA, for instance. In
October 2014, HRPA introduced a new
competency ​framework that tests both knowledge, and
the ability to apply that knowledge (i.e. competency) at
three distinct but related levels:

• Entry designation (CHRP)
• Professional designation (CHRL)
• Executive designation (CHRE)

FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND
UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
• This new competency framework was implemented in

support of the Registered Human Resources Professionals
Act, 2013 ​ (Ontario Regulation 55/16​);​

• first, to ensure that HR professionals have the knowledge
and expertise expected of them,

• second, to align the competency framework for HR with that
of other top professions, and

• third, to establish HR designations that are as credible and
as valued by organizations as other major associations’.​

  • HRPA
  • Agenda
  • ORIGIN
  • USES
  • USES
  • WHAT IS A COMPETENCY?
  • WHAT IS A COMPETENCY?
  • WHAT IS A COMPETENCY?
  • WHAT IS A COMPETENCY?
  • WHAT IS A COMPETENCY?
  • FUNCTIONAL AND ENABLING COMPETENCIES
  • Slide Number 12
  • Does this sound familiar?
  • FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
  • FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
  • FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
  • FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
  • FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
  • FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
  • FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
  • FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
  • FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
  • ENABLING COMPETENCIES
  • ENABLING COMPETENCIES
  • ENABLING COMPETENCIES
  • ENABLING COMPETENCIES
  • FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
  • FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS, AND UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES
  • Slide Number 29
  • Slide Number 30
  • Slide Number 31
  • Slide Number 32
  • Slide Number 33

Human Resources
Professional Competency
Framework

©2014 Human Resources Professionals Association (HRPA). This material either in part or in whole may not be copied, sold, licensed,
or otherwise redistributed, except for the following purpose: HRPA grants all users permission to download, print and use one copy of
the Professional Competency Framework™ expressly for individual non-commercial use. No copying or distribution of this document
in whole or in part without HRPA ’s prior explicit written permission is permitted. To request permission to copy or distribute, please
e-mail [email protected]

HUMAN RESOURCES PROFESSIONALS ASSOCIATION

Human Resources
Professional Competency Framework

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The HRPA Board of Directors would like to acknowledge the contribution of the following

volunteers in the development of the HR Professional Competency Framework.

THE HR PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCY FRAMEWORK TASK FORCE

Antoinette Blunt, CHRL, CHRE, FCHRP, Chair

Debbie Bennett, CHRL, CHRE

Brenda Clark, CHRL, CHRE

Louise Taylor-Green, CHRL, CHRE

Dr. Parbudyal Singh

HR PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCY FRAMEWORK
FOCUS GROUP PARTICIPANTS

Brett Abram, CHRL

Tammy Anderson, CHRL

Kim Aspden, CHRL

Rosemarie Auld, CHRL

Franca Berti-Bogojevic, CHRL

Loradonna Botter, CHRL

Margaret Braun, CHRE

Carol Calvert, CHRL

Manny Campione, CHRL

Dr. Nita Chhinzer

Jennifer Chung, CHRL

Robyn Cramer, CHRL

Elena Daly, CHRL

Jennifer D’Antonio, CHRL

Joanne Echlin, CHRL

Ali Farooqui, CHRL

Belinda Fernandez, CHRL

Heidi Flynn, CHRL

Scot Forsyth, CHRL

Michelle Francis, CHRL

Denise Ghanam, CHRL

Dennis Good, CHRL

Sindy Goodman, CHRL

Andrea Hampton, CHRL

Shady Hana, CHRL

Bev Hand

Renee Hannes, CHRL

John Hardisty, CHRL

Julie Haynes, CHRL

Susan Hunter, CHRL

Maria Kapsamer, CHRL

Susan Keast, CHRL

Lorri Kennis, CHRL

Daria Kowalyk, CHRL

Mary Kutarna, CHRL

Rhonda Lewis, CHRL, CHRE

Donna Licowsky, CHRL

Murray MacAlpine, CHRL

Danielle Mandell, CHRL

Susan Mangar, CHRL

Nicolette Mapplebeck, CHRL

Colleen McBride

Joanne Melanson, CHRL

Preiti Momaya, CHRL

Heather NearHopkins, CHRL

Erin Noble, CHRL

Sarah Northrup, CHRL

Kristie Obright, CHRL

Rochelle Pelletier, CHRL

Lynda Polan, CHRL

Jane Robitaille, CHRL

Janet Claudia Rodas, CHRL

Yosie Saint-Cyr

Ravinder Sanghera, CHRL

Mark Schrader, CHRL

Naseem Sherwani

Joanna Stanko, CHRL

Michael Stanojcic, CHRL

Wendy Sullivan, CHRL

Lelean Tait, CHRL

Mari Ann Tammark , CHRL

Lu Traikovich-Gonsalves, CHRL

Rafael Uzeda de Oliveira, CHRL

Susan Walsh, CHRL

Jane Watson, CHRL

Joan Whitman, CHRL

Kristine Wulf, CHRL

Anjana Yachamanani, CHRL

Andrew Yu, CHRL

Zhenchen (Daniel) Zhu, CHRL

© 2014 Human Resources Professionals Association 2

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Professional Competency Framework

CONTENTS

A COMPETENCY

FRAMEWORK FOR THE HUMAN

RESOURCES PROFESSION 4

What is a Competency? 4

Functional and Enabling

Competencies 5

Hierarchical Organization 5

Origin 6

Uses 6

Levels of Human Resources

Professionals in Ontario 6

Competency Framework 8

FUNCTIONAL AREAS,

GROUPINGS, AND

UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES 9

ENABLING COMPETENCIES 26

FUNCTIONAL

COMPETENCIES

MATRICES 27

10 Strategy 27

20 Professional Practice 42

30 Organizational

Effectiveness 53

40 Workforce Planning and

Talent Management 66

50 Labour and

Employee Relations 83

60 Total Rewards 96

70 Learning and Development 105

80 Health, Wellness,

and Safe Workplace 117

90 Human Resources Metrics,

Reporting, and Financial

Management 126

ENABLING COMPETENCIES

MATRIX 135

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A COMPETENCY FRAMEWORK FOR THE HUMAN
RESOURCES PROFESSION

WHAT IS A COMPETENCY?

A competency is a cluster of related knowledge, skills, abilities, and characteristics that
are related to the performance of a significant aspect of the practice of a profession.

A competency model is a collection of competencies that are relevant to the
performance in a particular job, job family, or functional area.

A competency framework is a broad framework for integrating, organizing, and
aligning various competency models.

A key aspect of competency

modelling is the notion of

performance. Competency is the

ability to perform a certain task.

The actual performance of a task

is evidenced as a “behavioural

indicator.”

The view of the Human Resources

Professional Association (HRPA)

towards competency modelling is

that “knowing” and “understanding”

are not competencies. Indeed,

although a competency is a cluster

of related knowledge, skills,

abilities, and characteristics that

are related to the performance of

a significant aspect of the practice

of a profession, it is understood

that a competency is more than

the sum of its parts—meaning that

having knowledge, skill, or ability

may not, in isolation, be sufficient

to be competent. Knowledge,

skill, or ability may be essential

for competence but they are not

the same as competence. There

must always be performance of

some sort, where knowledge and/

or comprehension are necessary for

that performance.

In other words, knowledge for

knowledge’s sake or comprehension

for comprehension’s sake is not that

useful. It is only when knowledge

or comprehension is used to

accomplish a task (performance)

that they become useful. For this

reason, HRPA has focused on

behavioural indicators, which are

descriptions of performance one

would expect at a given level.

These behavioural indicators are
descriptions of what it looks like to
demonstrate a given competency.
Behavioural indicators have the
following characteristics:

• They are highly specific markers

that, if present, imply that the

person has the competency in

question.

• They help set the degree and

scope of expectation for each

level of HR professional.

• They are examples of observable

behaviours.

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• Within a set (or cell, in the tables

that follow), they are not to be

taken as an exhaustive list.

One of the challenges of developing

a competency model for the HR

profession is the wide variety of

roles performed by HR professionals

and the wide variety of contexts

in which HR professionals practise

their profession. It is not expected

that all professionals will be required

to demonstrate all competencies

in their work or even throughout

their career. The HRPA Human

Resources Professional Competency

Framework applies to the broad HR

profession and not just to specific

roles or career levels, industries,

regions, or organization sizes. All

competencies are relevant to all

levels within the HR profession,

although the manner in which any

given competency may be expressed

will differ depending on the level,

role, industry, and organization size.

FUNCTIONAL AND
ENABLING COMPETENCIES
The HRPA Human Resources

Professional Competency

Framework recognizes two kinds

of competencies—functional

competencies and enabling

competencies. At the outset,

it should be noted that this

distinction is somewhat artificial

but it is made because it is useful

in a number of ways. A functional

competency relates to the

competence to perform tasks that

are within the scope of practice

of HR professionals. Enabling

competencies are more generic

competencies that are not specific

to the performance of HR tasks but

are nonetheless required for the

performance of such tasks.

It would have been possible to

consider enabling competencies as

fundamental skills underlying the

various functional competencies.

However, because of the

pervasiveness and importance of

these skills, it makes sense to refer

to them separately as enabling

competencies. By separating

these enabling competencies, we

recognize their distinct contribution

to performance as an HR

professional.

Despite this, there is a strong

relationship between enabling and

functional competencies. It needs

to be recognized that all functional

competencies imply some level

of proficiency within the enabling

competencies, and enabling

competencies on their own are

not enough to define the scope of

professional HR practice.

HIERARCHICAL ORGANIZATION
It is useful to organize competencies

hierarchically—from the broader to

the more specific or from the more

specific to the broader.

At the narrowest level of detail

are the specific competencies.

These may be regrouped into what

are called groupings of related

competencies. At the broadest level

are the functional areas.

Note that some competency

statements may be repeated

under different groupings, if that

same competency is necessary for

success in more than one grouping.

Competencies that are repeated are

marked with an asterisk. Similarly,

behavioural indicators may be

repeated across competencies and

between levels as appropriate (these

are not specifically marked).

FUNCTIONAL

AREAS

GROUPING OF

RELATED COMPETENCIES

SPECIFIC

COMPETENCIES

A numbering system is

employed to categorize the various

competency elements. The numbers

10 through 90 are used to denote

the 9 functional areas. Groupings

are marked as a numeral after

the decimal (e.g., 10.1 is the first

grouping in the first functional

area). Competencies are numbered

starting with C001, and are simply

sequential starting from grouping

10.1. Finally, behavioural indicators

all begin with the letter B, and

then 1 if they originate as Level 1

(e.g., B1001), 2 if they originate as

Level 2 (e.g., B2001), and 3 if they

originate as Level 3 (B3001). A Level

1 behavioural indicator will still start

with B1 even if it is repeated under

Level 2 or Level 3, and a Level 2

behavioural indicator will start with

B2 even if it is repeated under

Level 3.

The numbering system is for

convenience only. Likewise, the

order in which competencies and

behavioural indicators appear is

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not intended to denote any special

meaning or to imply the order in

which activities should occur in

practice.

ORIGIN
In 2012/13, the Canadian Council

of Human Resources Associations

worked with HR associations

and subject matter experts

across Canada to develop a

new Competency Framework

for Certified Human Resources

Professionals. HRPA participated

in the development sessions. This

work culminated in the development

of 44 functional tasks across 9

functional areas.

Notwithstanding the excellent

work resulting from the CCHRA

initiative, HRPA identified the need

for additional scope of detail for its

purposes in Ontario. Accordingly, it

contracted Wickett Measurement

Systems to create functional

competencies at a finer level of

detail, to develop behavioural

indicators across three levels of

HR professionals and to fully

develop and expand on the enabling

competencies. An HR Competency

Task Force was struck to oversee

the project, representing experts in

HR. Further, 10 focus groups were

held with representation from all

of Ontario to review the work and

provide suggestions for additions,

deletions and edits.

USES
This Competency Framework serves

to inform the role, function and

services HRPA provides. It serves

as the foundation for all credential

requirements. It can be used to

establish education requirements,

for examination development, and

for career planning.

This document is also valuable

to employers and employees

because it sets out the reasonable

expectations for those working in

HR roles. Educators can use the

information provided here to inform

and build curriculum, and students

and candidates can use it to inform

their preparations and study. Finally,

allied professionals can use the

document as a resource for the

scope of practice of those working

as HR professionals.

LEVELS OF HUMAN RESOURCES PROFESSIONALS IN ONTARIO

CHRP
HR professionals at the CHRP

level act in a contributing role in

a larger HR function or act as the

sole HR practitioner in a small

HR function. These roles are

mostly administrative in nature.

Individuals at this level have

responsibilities such as, but not

limited to, supporting HR initiatives,

executing tasks passed down from

management, and operating at the

tactical and transactional levels.

These roles could be understood

as “technologist” or “technician”

roles. Individuals at the CHRP

level will often have position

titles such as Human Resources

Assistant, Staffing Coordinator,

Human Resources Clerk, or Human

Resources Coordinator.

This person may or may not

have specialized HR training, but

is capable of learning the skills to

support the HR function in a small

or large organization. They would

report to a more senior HR staff

member. They must have strong

attention to detail and be motivated

to develop their skills and knowledge

relating to the HR function they are

supporting.

CHRP level staff members are

expected to be accountable for

carrying out their duties thoroughly

and with discretion, but are not

expected to lead activities or design

systems. Though their work is

subject to regular oversight, they do

not need monitoring of all their daily

tasks.

CHRL
HR professionals at the CHRL level

can be found in either specialist or

generalist positions. Individuals at

this level have responsibilities such

as, but not limited to, managing

projects, programs, and initiatives;

implementing plans passed down

senior management; and delegating

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tasks to entry-level staff. In

professional matters, individuals

at this level can act independently.

Individuals at CHRL will often have

position titles such as Director of

HR, Human Resources Manager,

Human Resources Generalist, and

Human Resources Specialist.

CHRL level professionals have

received specialized training in HR

and have spent at least three years

working full time in an HR setting.

They may be expected to report

to the Vice President of Human

Resources in a large firm or to be

the most senior HR person at a

smaller firm. They may have one or

more front-line HR staff reporting

to them, though in a small firm

they may be expected to perform

all HR functions themselves. They

are expected to understand and be

capable in all the HR functions and

to be able to understand how all the

functions work together within a

larger system.

They must not only be able

to carry out HR functions with

proficiency, but also to create HR

systems that support the mandate

of the firm. At a large firm, or one

spread across many geographic

locations and/or business lines,

CHRL level professionals may call on

other experts to help them in their

tasks. CHRL level staff members

understand that they are an

important part of the success of an

organization and that they will often

have sole responsibility for many

critical HR functions. They must be

consummate professionals who do

not need regular oversight.

CHRE
HR professionals at the CHRE level

can be found in either specialist

or generalist positions but have

a high level of experience and

responsibility. Individuals at this

level have responsibilities such

as, but not limited to, leading the

HR function and developing and

executing significant HR projects.

Individuals at CHRE will often have

position titles such as Vice President

of Human Resources, Director of HR

or Principal.

A CHRE level HR professional is

a person who, through personal

attributes and achievements, has

reached the upper echelons of the

profession. Although most CHRE

level HR professionals will be found

in corporations and the public sector,

CHRE professionals are also found in

other settings, such as consulting.

CHRE level professionals have

all the capabilities found at the

CHRL level, but have refined

their skills through experience

across business cycles and across

different types of organizations.

They are adept at seeing the big

picture and think outside their own

domain to enhance the success

of the organization in which they

work. They have left the technical

aspects of the HR function behind

for the most part and now focus on

short- and long-term strategy and

on implementing systems at an

organization-wide level.

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COMPETENCY FRAMEWORK

The diagram below illustrates the functional areas and enabling competencies in the HRPA Human Resources

Professional Competency Framework. The numbering of the functional areas below corresponds to that used in the

text that follows.

H R
COMP ETE NCY
FRAM EW ORK

10
Strategy

20
Professional
Practices

30
Organizational 
Effectiveness

40
Workforce planning
and talent 
management 50 

Labou r and
empl oyee
relati ons

60
Total 
Rewards

70
Learning and
development

80
Health, 
Wellness, 
and Safe 
Workplace

90
HR metrics,
reporting and
financial
management

Emotional 
Intelligence

Project 
Management

Decision­
Making Skills

Business Acumen

Independence

Ethical Behaviours 
and Professionalism

Relationship
Management Negot iation 

and Influencing

Strategic and 
Organizational
Leadership

Integration

Critical Legal 
Thinking

Quantitative Skills

Research Skills

Technological
Savvy

Critical 
Thinking 
Analysis

TEAM

ORGANIZATION

IN
DI

VI
D

AU
L

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FUNCTIONAL AREAS, GROUPINGS,

AND UNDERLYING COMPETENCIES

Without the

behavioural

indicators.

*An asterisk is
used to denote a

competency that

appears more

than once.

10 STRATEGY
A cluster of competencies related to the ability
to think and act strategically in regards to
organizations, business, and the HR function.

10.1 STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE
C001* Maintain awareness of broad economic, societal, technological,

political, global, and demographic trends.

C002* Identify HR opportunities and risks inherent in changes in economic,

societal, technological, political, and demographic forces.

C003 Formulate HR strategies within the organization that are informed

by factors that are both internal and external to the organization.

C004 Execute HR strategies that enhance the value of the human

resources within the organization.

10.2 GOVERNANCE PRINCIPLES
C005 Maintain awareness of leading practices in governance.

C006 Understand the relationship between governance and the

execution of strategy within the organization.

C007* Include governance considerations in the development

of HR strategies.

C008 Adhere to governance requirements in the execution

of HR strategies.

10.3 LEADERSHIP
C009 Maintain understanding of the roles and responsibilities of the

governing body and leadership.

C010 Maint ain understanding of the relationships between the

organization and its stakeholders.

C011 L ead the organization’s HR function with due consideration for the

roles and responsibilities of leadership and the governing body.

C012 Provide leadership to the staff in the HR department.

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C013 Direct HR activities towards the implementation of

the business plan.

C014* Manage risk in the execution of HR activities.

10.4 BUSINESS ACUMEN
C015* Maintain understanding of the organization’s vision,

mission, values, and goals.

C016 Apply sound business practices in carrying out the HR function.

C017 Participate with other business leaders in the development

of organizational strategy.

C018 Direct the HR function towards realizing the organization’s

vision and goals.

C019* Adhere to the organization’s values while carrying out its mission.

10.5 STRATEGIC ALIGNMENT
C020 Gain c omprehensive understanding of the organization’s

strategic plan.

C021 Assess variances between current HR practices and those required

to achieve the organization’s strategic plan.

C022 Develop potential tactics to achieve desired HR practices.

C023 Evaluate the relative efficacy of alternative tactical options.

C024 Establish a work plan that prioritizes the most effective steps to

achieve the desired HR practices.

C025 Manage the HR practices work plan, ensuring that the strategic

goals of the organization form the benchmark for success.

10.6 INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
C026 Integrate direction from a foreign head office into the

context of Canadian operations.

C026b Apply practices from Canadian head office into the operations

of a foreign field office.

C027 Develop an overall HR strategy that can be adapted to

various national contexts.

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20 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE
A cluster of competencies related to the ability to
conduct oneself in a professional manner and to
exhibit high levels of professionalism in all contexts
and situations.

20.1 BALANCED INTERESTS
C028 Build productive relationships both inside and outside

the organization.

C029 Adhere to accepted HR standards of practice.

C030* Balance the interests of all affected parties in carrying

out HR activities.

C031 Act with integrity in all undertakings.

C032 Mak e decisions only after considering all accessible

and relevant facts.

20.2 ETHICS
C033 Adhere to the HRPA Rules of Professional Conduct

in all undertakings.

C034 Model ethical practices for staff.

C030* Balance the interests of all affected parties in carrying

out HR activities.

20.3 LEGAL
C035 Demonstrate understanding of the application of HR legal

requirements in the workplace.

C036 Keep current on changes to the laws that govern HR practices.

C037 Adhere to legal requirements in carrying out all HR activities.

C038 Identify risks to the organization stemming from the need to adhere

to legal requirements.

C014* Manage risk in the execution of HR activities.

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20.4 RESPONSIBLE GOVERNANCE

C039 Assess the ethical implications of alternative courses of actions.

C040 Recommend only ethical solutions to problems.

C041 Promote ethical decision-making to the organization’s leadership.

C014* Manage risk in the execution of HR activities.

C007* Include governance considerations in the development of HR

strategies.

20.5 ADVANCEMENT OF THE PROFESSION
C042 Participate in activities that promote the HR profession.

C043 Promote the value of the HR profession in the workplace.

20.6 EVIDENCE-BASED APPROACH

C044 Consult the literature for solutions to HR challenges.

C045 Promote the use of data and quantitative and qualitative research in

the decision-making process.

C046 Document the rationale for HR decisions.

20.7 EXTERNAL TRENDS
C047 Evaluate the credibility of sources of information.

C048 Keep current on business information and trends.

C001* Maintain awareness of broad economic, societal, technological,

political, global, and demographic trends.

C002* Identify HR opportunities and risks inherent in changes in economic,

societal, technological, political, and demographic forces.

C049 Evaluate the applicability of new concepts and technology to the

practice of HR within the organization.

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30 ORGANIZATIONAL EFFECTIVENESS
A cluster of competencies related to using the
levers available to HR professionals to maximize
the performance of organizations, teams, and
individuals within the context of executing the
organization’s strategy.

30.1 PRODUCTIVITY
C050 De velop potential initiatives that align culture and values with

organizational strategy.

C051* Measure employee productivity.

C052* Measure employee engagement and morale.

30.2 ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE
C053 Diagnose when per formance issues are due to organizational

design problems.

C054 Work out the organizational structure that is most suitable given

the organizational strategy and objectives.

C055 Implement organizational redesign initiatives.

30.3 EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT
C056 Maintain knowledge of literature on employee engagement.

C057 Advocate strategies to enhance employee engagement with

senior management.

C052* Measure employee engagement and morale.

C058 Develop potential strategies to enhance employee engagement.

C059 Create work plans to implement employee engagement initiatives.

C060 Assess the impact of employee engagement initiatives.

C051* Measure employee productivity.

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30.4 RISK
C061 Identify the HR risk factors that may impede organizational

performance.

C062 Assess the potential impact of HR risk factors on

organizational performance.

C063 Develop initiatives that will minimize or mitigate the impact of

identified HR risk factors.

30.5 CHANGE MANAGEMENT

C064 Establish understanding of the short- and long-term goals of

planned organizational changes.

C065 Assess the HR implications of planned organizational changes.

C066 Evaluate the risks to success of an organizational change

management strategy.

C067 Contribute to the development of an organizational change

management strategy.

C068 Build an HR work plan to guide the necessary changes in concert

with the organization’s change management strategy.

30.6 TEAM EFFECTIVENESS
C069 Diagnose the team dynamics that are at the root of

team dysfunction.

C070 Develop team-based interventions designed to improve

team effectiveness.

C071 Implement team-based interventions that improve

team effectiveness.

C072 Assess team leadership on ability to guide the team to

successfully meet established goals.

C073 Develop interventions to improve the effectiveness of

leadership teams.

C074 Implement interventions when there is evidence of

leadership team dysfunction.

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30.7 JOB ANALYSIS
C075 C onduct a job analysis using an objective methodology that is

appropriate for the purpose for which the job analysis is conducted.

C076 Implement job enrichment, job enlargement, and job re-design

initiatives when deemed appropriate.

30.8 COMMUNICATING CHALLENGES AND DEVELOPMENTS

C077 Partner collaboratively with organizational leadership in the

development of communications.

C078 Communicate with employees in a manner that enhances

affiliation with the organization.

C079 Communicate with unions in a respectful manner that promotes

understanding of the organization’s challenges and developments.

C080 Craft communications that accurately portray the state of the

organization and that are engaging for employees, unions,

and stakeholders.

C081 Measure communication effectiveness.

40 WORKFORCE PLANNING AND
TALENT MANAGEMENT
A cluster of competencies related to the
recruitment and deployment of human resources
within an organization.

40.1 WORKFORCE PLAN DEVELOPMENT
C015* Maintain understanding of the organization’s vision, mission,

values, and goals.

C082 Create a future-focused workforce plan.

C083* Measure gaps in current talent needs.

C084* Assess future talent needs.

40.2 EMPLOYEE VALUE PROPOSITION
C085* Measure the impact of attraction initiatives.

C086* Identify the characteristics of desirable potential employees.

C087 Create an employee value proposition statement.

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C088 Identify potential changes that …

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