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Required Resources
Read/review the following resources for this activity:

· Textbook: pp. 510-523.

Initial Post Instructions

Main Post Part 1: Read and Respond
After thoroughly reading the Week 8 lesson and the required textbook pages, go back and re-read, specifically, the articles from the assigned Week 8 textbook pages. Ask yourself: In the textbook readings, which statements in these articles inspire me? How and why? Do any statements bother me? How and why?” Take careful notes, jotting down quotations and your reactions to them, based on those questions. After you have given good time and attention to this process, you will begin writing Part 1 of your discussion post.

A note: Keep in mind that your actual post will require that you express yourself openly. While correctness is always important, try to steer away from obsessing over strict “rules” so that you may focus on you and your feelings and passions. It is absolutely crucial that we step away, at times, from intellectualizing and dive, instead, into pure gut reaction, to what our heart says about what we are reading and into writing about that freely. This is the fertile soil for those big ideas that might turn into dreams, then into realities, in our future.

Instructions for Part 1:
Identify two specific direct quotations from two separate readings in your assigned Week 8 textbook pages that you noted having a gut/heart reaction to. Be sure to use signal phrases and to cite these in-text and in an end reference.

In at least one full paragraph, write about one quotation at a time. Identify the first quotation, then truly let yourself go. Let your heart and gut speak. Why did you choose this first quotation? How did it make you feel? Why? Then, in the same paragraph, identify the second quotation. Finally, as with the first quotation, truly let yourself go. Let your heart and gut speak. Why did you choose this second quotation? How did it make you feel? Why?

Main Post Part 2: So…What Are You Inspired to Do?
In another full paragraph minimum, still sticking to your heart and gut, freely write about what your reactions in Part 1 inspire you to do.

Note: Before composing this part of your post, you should brainstorm separately, in your own notebook or on a “brainstorming Word doc,” generating many possibilities: large, small, local, global, at home, in the community, with one person, with a thousand people, whatever occurs to you. Let yourself “go” and list, list, list everything that comes to mind as an action you might take in response to your feelings in Part 1. Some of your ideas may seem far-fetched; don’t be afraid to express them. Do not limit yourself to sharing just the practical, smart, reasonable actions. Have fun! Then, turn that into a good paragraph for your post.

Follow-Up Post Instructions
Respond to at least one peer. Here, in reading others’ posts and replying to them, you will be exposed to reactions that may be very similar to your own and reactions that may be quite different from yours. You will hopefully also see some wonderful and eye-opening ideas for application. So, in your reply post, please focus on sharing similarities and differences in your reactions and help your classmates brainstorm for more actions that might be taken based on your classmates’ gut and heart reactions and on your own.

Writing Requirements

· Minimum of 2 posts (1 initial & 1 follow-up)

· Minimum of 2 sources cited (assigned readings/online lessons and an outside scholarly source)

· APA format for in-text citations and list of references

Read, Reason, Write

AN ARGUMENT TEXT AND READER

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TWELFTH EDITION

AN ARGUMENT TEXT AND READER

Read, Reason, Write

Dorothy U. Seyler
Allen Brizee

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READ, REASON, WRITE: AN ARGUMENT TEXT AND READER, TWELFTH EDITION

Published by McGraw-Hill Education, 2 Penn Plaza, New York, NY 10121. Copyright © 2019 by McGraw-Hill
Education. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America. Previous editions © 2015, 2012, and
2010. No part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a
database or retrieval system, without the prior written consent of McGraw-Hill Education, including, but not
limited to, in any network or other electronic storage or transmission, or broadcast for distance learning.

Some ancillaries, including electronic and print components, may not be available to customers outside the
United States.

This book is printed on acid-free paper.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 LCR/LCR 21 20 19 18

ISBN: 978-1-259-91627-4
MHID: 1-259-91627-8

Brand Manager: Penina Braffman Greenfield
Product Developer: Elizabeth Murphy
Marketing Manager: Marisa Cavanaugh
Content Project Manager: Lisa Bruflodt 
Buyer: Sandy Ludovissy
Designer: Jessica Cuevas
Content Licensing Specialist: DeAnna Dausener
Cover Image: © Piriya Photography/Moment/Getty Images
Compositor: Lumina Datamatics, Inc.

All credits appearing on page or at the end of the book are considered to be an extension of the copyright page.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Names: Seyler, Dorothy U., author. | Brizee, Allen, author.
Title: Read, reason, write : an argument text and reader / Dorothy U. Seyler,
Allen Brizee.
Description: Twelfth edition. | New York, NY : McGraw-Hill Education, 2019.
Identifiers: LCCN 2017045184 (print) | LCCN 2017046594 (ebook) | ISBN
9781260195088 (Online) | ISBN 9781259916274 (softbound) | ISBN
9781260195064 (looseleaf)
Subjects: LCSH: English language—Rhetoric. | Persuasion (Rhetoric) | College
readers. | Report writing.
Classification: LCC PE1408 (ebook) | LCC PE1408 .S464 2019 (print) | DDC
808/.0427—dc23
LC record available at https://lccn.loc.gov/2017045184

The Internet addresses listed in the text were accurate at the time of publication. The inclusion of a Web site
does not indicate an endorsement by the authors or McGraw-Hill Education, and McGraw-Hill Education does
not guarantee the accuracy of the information presented at these sites.

mheducation.com/highered

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v

Brief Contents
SECTION 1 CRITICAL READING AND ANALYSIS 1

Chapter 1 Writers and Their Sources 2
Chapter 2 Responding Critically to Sources 32

SECTION 2 THE WORLD OF ARGUMENT 63

Chapter 3 Understanding the Basics of Argument 64
Chapter 4 Writing Effective Arguments 94
Chapter 5 Reading, Analyzing, and Using Visuals and

Statistics in Argument 116
Chapter 6 Learning More about Argument: Induction, Deduction,

Analogy, and Logical Fallacies 146

SECTION 3 STUDYING SOME ARGUMENTS BY GENRE 175

Chapter 7 Definition Arguments 176
Chapter 8 Evaluation Arguments 194
Chapter 9 The Position Paper: Claims of Values 209
Chapter 10 Arguments about Cause 225
Chapter 11 Presenting Proposals: The Problem/Solution

Argument 241

SECTION 4 THE RESEARCHED AND FORMALLY DOCUMENTED
ARGUMENT 265

Chapter 12 Locating, Evaluating, and Preparing to Use Sources 266
Chapter 13 Writing the Researched Essay 285
Chapter 14 Formal Documentation: MLA Style, APA Style 319

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SECTION 5 A COLLECTION OF READINGS 357

Chapter 15 The Media: Image and Reality 359
Chapter 16 The Web and Social Media: Their Impact on Our Lives 381
Chapter 17 Marriage and Gender Issues: The Debates Continue 401
Chapter 18 Education in America: Issues and Concerns 423
Chapter 19 The Environment: How Do We Sustain It? 443
Chapter 20 Laws and Rights: Gun Control and Immigration Debates 469
Chapter 21

Appendix

America: Past, Present, Future 495

Understanding Literature 524

vi BRIEF CONTENTS

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vii

Contents
New to the Twelfth Edition xvii

Features of Read, Reason, Write xix

Let Connect Composition Help Your Students Achieve Their Goals xxi

From the Authors xxv

About the Authors xxvii

SECTION 1 CRITICAL READING AND ANALYSIS 1

Chapter 1 WRITERS AND THEIR SOURCES 2
Reading, Writing, and the Contexts of Argument 3
Responding to Sources 4
Abraham Lincoln, “The Gettysburg Address” 4

The Response to Content 5
The Analytic Response 5
The Evaluation Response 6
The Research Response 7

Deborah Tannen, “Who Does the Talking Here?” 7
Writing Summaries 10
Active Reading: Use Your Mind! 13
Ruth Whippman, “Actually, Let’s Not Be in the Moment” 14
Using Paraphrase 16
Acknowledging Sources Informally 18

Referring to People and Sources 18

Joel Achenbach, “The Future Is Now: It’s Heading Right at Us, but We
Never See It Coming” 20
Presenting Direct Quotations: A Guide to Form and Style 23

Reasons for Using Quotation Marks 24
A Brief Guide to Quoting 24

For Reading and Analysis 26
Alex Knapp, “Five Leadership Lessons from James T. Kirk” 26
Suggestions for Discussion and Writing 31

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Chapter 2 RESPONDING CRITICALLY TO SOURCES 32
Traits of the Critical Reader/Thinker 33
Examining the Rhetorical Context of a Source 33

Who Is the Author? 34
What Type—or Genre—of Source Is It? 34
What Kind of Audience Does the Author Anticipate? 34
What Is the Author’s Primary Purpose? 35
What Are the Author’s Sources of Information? 35

Analyzing the Style of a Source 36
Denotative and Connotative Word Choice 37
Tone 39
Level of Diction 39
Sentence Structure 40
Metaphors 42
Organization and Examples 42
Repetition 43
Hyperbole, Understatement, and Irony 43
Quotation Marks, Italics, and Capital Letters 43

Alexandra Petri, “Nasty Women Have Much Work to Do” 45
Writing about Style 48

Understanding Purpose and Audience 48
Planning the Essay 48
Drafting the Style Analysis 49

Ellen Goodman, “In Praise of a Snail’s Pace” 50
Student Essay: James Goode, “A Convincing Style” 53
Analyzing Two or More Sources 55
Synthesizing Two or More Sources 57
Adam Grant, “Why I Taught Myself to Procrastinate” 57
Suggestions for Discussion and Writing 61

SECTION 2 THE WORLD OF ARGUMENT 63

Chapter 3 UNDERSTANDING THE BASICS OF ARGUMENT 64
Characteristics of Argument 65

Argument Is Conversation with a Goal 65
Argument Takes a Stand on an Arguable Issue 65
Argument Uses Reasons and Evidence 65
Argument Incorporates Values 66
Argument Recognizes the Topic’s Complexity 66

The Shape of Argument: What We Can Learn from Aristotle 66
Ethos (about the Writer/Speaker) 66
Logos (about the Logic of the Argument) 67

viii CONTENTS

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CONTENTS ix

Pathos (about Appeals to the Audience) 67
Kairos (about the Occasion or Situation) 68

The Language of Argument 69
Facts 70
Inferences 70
Judgments 71

Sam Wang and Sandra Aamodt, “Your Brain Lies to You” 72
The Shape of Argument: What We Can Learn from Toulmin 75

Claims 76
Grounds (or Data or Evidence) 78
Warrants 78
Backing 79
Qualifiers 79
Rebuttals 80

Using Toulmin’s Terms to Analyze Arguments 80
Erin Brodwin, “The Secret to Efficient Teamwork Is Ridiculously Simple” 81
For Analysis and Debate 83
Christina Paxson, “A Safe Place for Freedom of Expression” 83
Geoffrey R. Stone, “Free Speech on Campus” 86
Suggestions for Discussion and Writing 93

Chapter 4 WRITING EFFECTIVE ARGUMENTS 94
Know Your Audience 95

Who Is My Audience? 95
What Will My Audience Know about My Topic? 95
Where Does My Audience Stand on the Issue? 96
How Should I Speak to My Audience? 96

Understand Your Writing Purpose 97
What Type (Genre) of Argument Am I Preparing? 98
What Is My Goal? 98
Will the Rogerian or Conciliatory Approach Work for Me? 99

Move from Topic to Claim to Possible Support 99
Selecting a Topic 100
Drafting a Claim 100
Listing Possible Grounds 101
Listing Grounds for the Other Side or Another Perspective 101
Planning Your Approach 102

Draft Your Argument 103
Revise Your Draft 104

Rewriting 104
Editing 105

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A Few Words about Word Choice and Tone 106
Proofreading 107

For Analysis and Debate 108
Darius Rejali, “Five Myths about Torture and Truth” 108
M. Gregg Bloche, “Torture Is Wrong—But It Might Work” 111
Suggestions for Discussion and Writing 115

Chapter 5 READING, ANALYZING, AND USING VISUALS AND
STATISTICS IN ARGUMENT 116
Responding to Visual Arguments 117

Visual Rhetoric and Visual Literacy 117

Reading Graphics 124
Understanding How Graphics Differ 124

The Uses of Authority and Statistics 128
Judging Authorities 128
Understanding and Evaluating Statistics 130

Writing the Investigative Argument 131
Gathering and Analyzing Evidence 131
Planning and Drafting the Essay 133
Analyzing Evidence: The Key to an Effective Argument 133
Preparing Graphics for Your Essay 134

Student Essay: Garrett Berger, “Buying Time” 135
For Reading and Analysis 140
Joe Navarro, “Every Body’s Talking” 140
Suggestions for Discussion and Writing 145

Chapter 6 LEARNING MORE ABOUT ARGUMENT: INDUCTION, DEDUCTION,
ANALOGY, AND LOGICAL FALLACIES 146
Induction 147
Deduction 148
“The Declaration of Independence” 153
Analogy 157
Logical Fallacies 158

Causes of Illogic 158
Fallacies That Result from Oversimplifying 159
Fallacies That Result from Avoiding the Real Issue 162

For Reading and Analysis 167
Elizabeth Cady Stanton, “Declaration of Sentiments” 167
Peter Wehner, “In Defense of Politics, Now More Than Ever Before” 170

x CONTENTS

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SECTION 3 STUDYING SOME ARGUMENTS BY GENRE 175

Chapter 7 DEFINITION ARGUMENTS 176
Defining as Part of an Argument 177
When Defining Is the Argument 178
Strategies for Developing an Extended Definition 178
Preparing a Definition Argument 181
Student Essay: Laura Mullins, “Paragon or Parasite?” 182
For Analysis and Debate 185
Robin Givhan, “Glamour, That Certain Something” 185
Nicholas Haslam, “Crossing the Aegean Is ‘Traumatic.’ Your Bad Hair Day
Isn’t” 188
Suggestions for Discussion and Writing 193

Chapter 8 EVALUATION ARGUMENTS 194
Characteristics of Evaluation Arguments 195
Types of Evaluation Arguments 196
Preparing an Evaluation Argument 197
Student Review: Ian Habel, “Winchester’s Alchemy: Two Men and a Book” 199
Evaluating an Argument: The Rebuttal or Refutation Essay 202
Douglas Holtz-Eakin, “Globalization Shouldn’t Be a Dirty Word” 203
For Analysis and Debate 205
Thomas Sowell, “Christmas-Tree Totalitarians” 205
Suggestions for Discussion and Writing 208

Chapter 9 THE POSITION PAPER: CLAIMS OF VALUES 209
Characteristics of the Position Paper 210
Preparing a Position Paper 211
Student Essay: Chris Brown, “Examining the Issue of Gun Control” 213
Zainab Chaudry, “Ending Intolerance toward Minority Communities: Hate
Attacks on Sikh Americans” 217
Kaye Wise Whitehead, “A Never Ending War” 219
Haider Javed Warraich, “On Assisted Suicide, Going Beyond
‘Do No Harm’ ” 221
Suggestions for Discussion and Writing 224

Chapter 10 ARGUMENTS ABOUT CAUSE 225
Characteristics of Causal Arguments 226

An Example of Causal Complexity: Lincoln’s Election and the Start
of the Civil War 228
Mill’s Methods for Investigating Causes 229

CONTENTS xi

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Preparing a Causal Argument 231
For Analysis and Debate 233
Caroline Simard, “‘Daring to Discuss Women in Science’: A Response to
John Tierney” 233
David A. Strauss, “A New Wave of Equality” 236
Suggestions for Discussion and Writing 240

Chapter 11 PRESENTING PROPOSALS: THE PROBLEM/SOLUTION
ARGUMENT 241
Characteristics of Problem/Solution Arguments 242
Priya Natarajan, “Want More Scientists? Turn Grade Schools into
Laboratories” 244
Braden Allenby, “After Armstrong’s Fall, the Case for Performance
Enhancement” 247
Preparing a Problem/Solution Argument 251

Planning 251
Drafting 251

For Analysis and Debate 253
Gretchen Carlson, “My Fight Against Sexual Harassment” 253
Jonathan Swift, “A Modest Proposal” 256
Suggestions for Discussion and Writing 263

SECTION 4 THE RESEARCHED AND FORMALLY DOCUMENTED
ARGUMENT 265

Chapter 12 LOCATING, EVALUATING, AND PREPARING TO USE SOURCES 266
Selecting a Good Topic 267

What Type of Paper Am I Preparing? 267
Who Is My Audience? 267
How Can I Select a Good Topic? 268
What Kinds of Topics Should I Avoid? 268

Writing a Tentative Claim or Research Proposal 269
Preparing a Working Bibliography 270

Basic Form for Books 271
Basic Form for Articles 272

Locating Sources 273
The Book Catalog 273
The Reference Collection 274
Databases 275
The Web 277

Field Research 278
Federal, State, and Local Government Documents 278
Correspondence 278
Interviews 278

xii CONTENTS

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Lectures 279
Films, DVDs, Television 279
Surveys, Questionnaires, and Original Research 279

Evaluating Sources, Maintaining Credibility 280
Preparing an Annotated Bibliography 282
Student Annotated Bibliography: David Donaldson, “Tell Us What You Really
Are: The Debate over Labeling Genetically Modified Food” 283

Chapter 13 WRITING THE RESEARCHED ESSAY 285
Avoiding Plagiarism 286

What Is Common Knowledge? 289

Using Signal Phrases to Avoid Confusion 289
Organizing the Paper 293
Drafting the Essay 294

Plan Your Time 294
Handle In-Text Documentation as You Draft 294
Choose an Appropriate Writing Style 294
Write Effective Beginnings 296
Avoid Ineffective Openings 297
Compose Solid, Unified Paragraphs 298
Write Effective Conclusions 302
Avoid Ineffective Conclusions 303
Choose an Effective Title 303

Revising the Paper: A Checklist 303
Rewriting 304
Editing 304
Proofreading 305

The Completed Paper 305
Student Essay in MLA Style: David Donaldson, “Tell Us What You Really Are:
The Debate Over Labeling Genetically Modified Food” 305

Chapter 14 FORMAL DOCUMENTATION: MLA STYLE, APA STYLE 319
The Simplest Patterns of Parenthetical Documentation 321
Placement of Parenthetical Documentation 321
Parenthetical Citations of Complex Sources 322
Preparing MLA Citations for a Works Cited List 325

Forms for Books: Citing the Complete Book 326
Forms for Books: Citing Part of a Book 329
Forms for Periodicals: Articles in Magazines, Journals, and Newspapers 330
Forms for Periodicals: Articles in Newspapers Accessed in Print 332
Forms for Digital Sources 333
Forms for Other Print and Nonprint Sources 335

CONTENTS xiii

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APA Style 338
APA Style: In-Text Citations 338

APA Style: Preparing a List of References 341
Form for Books 342
Form for Articles 343
Form for Electronic Sources 344

Student Essay in APA Style: Carissa Ervine, “The Relationship Between
Depression and Marital Status” 345

SECTION 5 A COLLECTION OF READINGS 357

Chapter 15 THE MEDIA: IMAGE AND REALITY 359
Mark Edmundson, “Off to See the Wizard: Finding the Virtues of Homer,
Plato, and Jesus in Technicolor Oz” 360
Student Essay: Sienna Walker, “Big Pun’s Prophesy” 364
Stuart Elliott, “Coca-Cola—Taste the Change” 369
Tim Wu, “Mother Nature Is Brought to You By . . .” 371
Sanford J. Ungar, “Bannon called the media the ‘opposition.’ He’s right,
and it’s a good thing.” 375
Heather C. McGhee, “ ‘I’m Prejudiced,’ He Said. Then We Kept Talking.” 378

Chapter 16 THE WEB AND SOCIAL MEDIA: THEIR IMPACT ON OUR LIVES 381
Steven Pinker, “Mind over Mass Media” 382
Susan P. Crawford, “The New Digital Divide” 385
Fareed Zakaria, “Bile, Venom, and Lies: How I Was Trolled on
the Internet” 389
Liza Tucker, “The Right to Bury the (Online) Past” 392
Caitlin Gibson, “Clever Is Forever” 394
George Yancy, “I Am a Dangerous Professor” 397

Chapter 17 MARRIAGE AND GENDER ISSUES: THE DEBATES CONTINUE 401
Meg Jay, “The Downside of Living Together” 403
Stephanie Coontz, “Want a Happier Marriage, Dads? Then Take
Paternity Leave” 406
Lisa Jaster, “Women Will Make Units Stronger” 409
Jonathan Rauch, “Here’s How 9 Predictions about Gay
Marriage Turned Out” 411
Gloria Steinem, “Supremacy Crimes” 417

Chapter 18 EDUCATION IN AMERICA: ISSUES AND CONCERNS 423
Richard D. Kahlenberg, “To Really Integrate Schools, Focus on
Wealth, Not Race” 425

xiv CONTENTS

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Kate Walsh, “The National Teacher Shortage Is a Myth. Here’s What’s
Really Happening” 428
Joseph Zengerle, “Why Future Officers Should Read Shakespeare, Know
History and Understand Psychology” 430
Danielle Allen, “Tuition Is Now a Useless Concept in
Higher Education” 433
Charles R. Pruitt, “Partisan Politics Is Cutting the Heart out
of Public Ivies” 436
Howard Gardner, “Why Kids Cheat at Harvard” 440

Chapter 19 THE ENVIRONMENT: HOW DO WE SUSTAIN IT? 443
Gregory M. Kennedy, S.J., “Trash Talk: Reflections on Our
Throwaway Society” 445
Michael Novacek, “The Sixth Extinction: It Happened to Him. It’s
Happening to You.” 449
Bob Silberg, “Why a Half-Degree Temperature Rise Is a Big Deal” 453
Art Carden, “On Climate Change, Government Is Not the Answer” 457
Alexander Starritt, “The Cleverest Countries on Climate Change—and
What We Can Learn from Them” 459
Rachel Nuwer, “Elephant Loss Tied to Ivory Trade” 465

Chapter 20 LAWS AND RIGHTS: GUN CONTROL AND IMMIGRATION
DEBATES 469
Daniel Webster and Ronald Daniels, “Allowing Guns on Campus Will Invite
Tragedies, Not End Them” 470
David B. Rivkin Jr and Andrew M. Grossman, “Gun Control Proposals in the
Wake of Orlando Could Endanger Constitutional Rights” 474
Robert Wilson, “It’s Time for Police Officers to Start Demanding Gun Laws
That Could End Up Saving Their Own Lives” 476
Amy Chua, “Immigrate, Assimilate” 482
Roberto Suro, “Legal, Illegal” 487
Janet Napolitano, “The Truth about Young Immigrants and DACA” 491

Chapter 21 AMERICA: PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE 495
Abraham Lincoln, “Second Inaugural Address” 496
Deidre N. McCloskey, “The Formula for a Richer World? Equality, Liberty,
Justice, and Wealth” 498
Barack H. Obama, “Remarks by the President at the 50th Anniversary of
the Selma to Montgomery Marches” 502
Kwame Anthony Appiah, “How the Future Will Judge Us” 511
Anne Applebaum, “Trump’s Dark Promise to Return to
a Mythical Past” 514
Neil DeGrasse Tyson, “A Cosmic Perspective” 517

CONTENTS xv

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Appendix UNDERSTANDING LITERATURE 524
Getting the Facts: Active Reading, Summary, and Paraphrase 525
Paul Lawrence Dunbar, “Promise” 525
Kate Chopin, “The Story of an Hour” 526

Summary of “The Story of an Hour” 528

William Shakespeare, “Sonnet 116” 528
Paraphrase of “Sonnet 116” 529

Seeing Connections: Analysis 530
Analysis of Narrative Structure 531
Analysis of Character 531
Analysis of Elements of Style and Tone 532

Drawing Conclusions: Interpretation 533
Writing about Literature 533
Andrew Marvell, “To His Coy Mistress” 534
Christopher Marlowe, “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” 535
Sir Walter Raleigh, “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd” 536
A. E. Housman, “Is My Team Ploughing” 537
Amy Lowell, “Taxi” 538
Janet Taliaferro, “The Last Civilized Act” 539
Susan Glaspell, “Trifles” 544
Student Literary Analysis: Alan Peterson, “Faulkner’s Realistic
Initiation Theme” 561
Suggestions for Discussion and Writing 567

Index 568

xvi CONTENTS

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xvii

New to the
Twelfth Edition

This new edition continues the key features of previous editions while adding new
material that will make it even more helpful to both students and instructors. Significant
changes include the following:

• New readings. This edition features a rich collection of eighty readings, both
timely and classic, that provide examples of the varied uses of language and strate-
gies for argument. Forty-six of these readings are entirely new to this edition and
include high-quality examples of argument written by author and activist Kaye
Wise Whitehead, philosopher and novelist Kwame Anthony Appiah, Pulitzer
Prize-winning foreign policy journalist Anne Applebaum, noted author and profes-
sor of psychology Steven Pinker, political columnist and CNN host Fareed Zakaria,
astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, and engineer and U.S. Army Reserve soldier
Lisa Jaster—to name only a few.

• New coverage. An entirely new section in  Chapter 5 introduces students to the
concepts of visual rhetoric and visual literacy, including Gestalt principles and the
C.A.R.P. design model. Chapter 6 includes additional in-depth coverage of deduc-
tive reasoning in written argument, and Chapter 13 is updated to address changes in
technology for drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading a paper, as well as sub-
mitting it to an instructor.

• New visuals. Almost all of the readings in this edition feature compelling visuals
that illustrate the topics discussed therein. At the outset of each chapter, students
are presented with a visual prompt tied to critical thinking questions that engage
them with key concepts covered throughout that chapter.

• Updated documentation coverage. MLA coverage is updated throughout to align
with the eighth edition of the MLA Handbook. Chapter 14 includes instruction
around these new guidelines, including ten new example MLA citation models.
This chapter also covers the latest APA guidelines for using and citing secondary
sources.

• Focus on current issues that are relevant to students. Of the seven chapters in
the anthology section, all have new readings and several take on a new and timely
focus. For example, Chapter 17 on marriage focuses on the issue of marriage equal-
ity, Chapter 18 on education concentrates on the topics of school choice and tuition,
and Chapter 20 on laws and rights examines guns on campus and the “Dream Act.”

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xix

Features of Read,
Reason, Write

Read, Reason, Write supports and aligns with the WPA Outcomes Statement for First-Year
Composition (NCTE, 2014). This text’s content and presentation are guided by decades of
classroom experience and by research and theory in composition and rhetoric. This com-
bination has made Read, Reason, Write a best-selling text for now twelve editions.

• Teaches critical thinking, reading, and composing through a step-by-step
approach to inquiry, analysis, and writing. This text introduces students to vari-
ous genres and guides them in analyzing style, rhetorical construction, and effec-
tiveness. It provides exercises for individual and group work to practice critical
reading and analysis. Questions are included to guide students in responding to,
analyzing, evaluating, and researching and writing about content.

• Provides instruction for beginning, drafting, completing, and then revising summa-
ries, analyses, and arguments. Guided by convention expectations, the text provides
instruction in overall organization, paragraph structure, and sentence-level issues such as
tone, mechanics, and attribution tailored to various genres. The text also contains
instruction in analyzing and using graphics, images, and document design, helping stu-
dents to think critically about—and also produce—visually enhanced communication.

• Provides instruction in both classical and contemporary rhetorical theory. The
text presents rhetorical theories in an accessible way to help instructors teach and
students learn these concepts. But, Read, Reason, Write also presents argument as
contextual: written (or spoken) to a specific audience with the expectation of
counterarguments.

• Includes guidelines and revision boxes throughout. These tools provide an easy
reference for students.

• Offers thorough and easy-to-reference coverage of both MLA and APA
documentation requirements.

• Features nine student essays. These illustrate the kinds of writing students will be
asked to prepare in the course—summaries, analyses, arguments, and formally doc-
umented papers.

• Presents a rich collection of readings. Readings are both timely and classic, pro-
viding examples of the varied uses of language and strategies for argument.

• Offers a brief but comprehensive introduction to reading and analyzing litera-
ture. Found in the appendix, this section also contains a student essay of literary analysis.

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xxi

Let Connect
Composition Help

Your Students
Achieve their Goals

Connect is a highly reliable, easy-to-use homework and learning management solution
that embeds learning science and award-winning adaptive tools to improve student
results. Connect Composition addresses the specific needs of the writing course and
various redesign models of instruction. In addition to the innovative content, revolution-
ary learning technology drives skills for the Argument course through a selection of
corresponding toolsets.

Power of Process

One overarching goal is at the heart of Power of Process: for students to become
self-regulating, strategic readers and writers. Power of Process facilitates engaged
reading and writing processes using research-based best practices suggested by major
professional reading and writing organizations.

Power of Process promotes close, strategic reading and critical thinking, leading to
richer, more insightful academic reading and writing in the Argument course and
beyond.

Connect Composition eReader

The Connect Composition eReader provides approximately seventy compelling readings
that instructors can incorporate into their syllabi. Readings are available across a wide
variety of genres, including arguments and literary selections. Instructors can filter the
readings by theme, discipline, genre, rhetorical mode, reading level, and word count.

LearnSmart Achieve

LearnSmart Achieve offers students an adaptive, individualized learning experience
designed to ensure the efficient mastery of reading and writing skills in tandem. By

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xxii LET CONNECT COMPOSITION HELP YOUR STUDENTS ACHIEVE THEIR GOALS

targeting students’ particular strengths and weaknesses, LearnSmart Achieve customizes
its lessons and facilitates high-impact learning at an accelerated pace.

LearnSmart Achieve provides instruction and practice for your students in the
following areas.

UNIT TOPIC

THE WRITING
PROCESS

The Writing Process
Generating Ideas
Planning and Organizing

Writing a Rough Draft
Revising
Proofreading, Formatting, and

Producing Texts

CRITICAL
READING

Reading to Understand
Literal Meaning

Evaluating Truth and
Accuracy in a Text

Evaluating the Effectiveness and
Appropriateness of a Text

THE RESEARCH
PROCESS

Developing and
Implementing a
Research Plan

Evaluating Information and
Sources

Integrating Source Material into
a Text

Using Information Ethically and
Legally

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Power of Process

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LET CONNECT COMPOSITION HELP YOUR STUDENTS ACHIEVE THEIR GOALS xxiii

REASONING
AND
ARGUMENT

Developing an Effective
Thesis or Claim

Using Evidence and
Reasoning to Support a
Thesis or Claim

Using Ethos (Ethics) to Persuade
Readers

Using Pathos (Emotion) to
Persuade Readers

Using Logos (Logic) to Persuade
Readers

GRAMMAR AND
COMMON
SENTENCE
PROBLEMS

Parts of Speech
Phrases and Clauses
Sentence Types
Fused (Run-on) Sentences
Comma Splices
Sentence Fragments
Pronouns

Pronoun-Antecedent Agreement
Pronoun Reference
Subject-Verb Agreement
Verbs and Verbals
Adjectives and Adverbs
Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers
Mixed Constructions
Verb Tense …

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